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Top 8 Panasonic Cameras Reviewed

Rating: 5.00 based on 1 Rating
Igor Letilovic
  By Igor Letilovic
Top 8 Panasonic Cameras Reviewed www.sleeklens.com

Through this extensive article, we bring you the best of the best, the ultimate collection, the creme de la creme of what Panasonic has to offer in their camera department. Instead of putting the best right at the beginning we’ve decided to change it up a little and start with the most affordable option out of the bunch. So without further delay, let’s get straight to business.

Panasonic Lumix FZ300Go to Amazon
Since this list of best Panasonic cameras starts first with the cheapest one, it's only expected that the Lumix DMC-FZ300 takes the first place.
Overall rating:
75
Size:
0
65
100
Design:
0
90
100
Price:
0
60
100
Ease of Use:
0
85
100
Pros
  • Leica DC Vario-Elmarit f/2.8 Lens
  • 25-600mm (35mm Equivalent)
  • Built-in WiFi
  • 4K Photo mode
  • 5-Axis HYBRID Optical Image Stabilization
  • Depth-From-Defocus AF Technology
  • Dustproof body
Cons
  • Low mpx count
  • Low battery life
Click to read the full Review
Usually, there aren't many things exciting about a camera with the 1/2.3 inch sensor, but this one is an exception. The sensor in question is the 12 megapixel BSI-CMOS one which at least shows one very positive thing about it and that's the megapixel count and Backlight illumination. More often than not it's a great thing to have a camera sensor with a high megapixel count, but in the case of these sensors commonly found in compact cameras 12 megapixel is a sweet spot. Too many of today's camera manufacturers are putting 16 or 20 megapixels 1/2.3 inch sensors in their cameras just for the sake of it sounding good on the specs sheet and not caring for the increased noise and artifacts you'll get with such a high resolution on such a small sensor.

We applaud Panasonic for not following the trend and instead of going for a more sensible and logical solution. Now that we've got that out of the way, it's time to mention this camera's major selling point, it's lens. Panasonic, by some voodoo magic, somehow managed to invent and put a 25-600mm equivalent lens with a constant f2.8 aperture on the camera of this type. As if the zoom range itself wasn't impressive enough they decided to go all out and make it infinite times better with such an aperture. On top of all that, the lens is also optically stabilized and there's also a brand new 5-axis hybrid IS for video recording (unfortunately only for 1080p).

All though this camera has more tricks up its sleeve, it's hard to move away from this particular feature and be as impressed with others. As you can already see by looking at the FZ300, it's an SLR-like bridge camera and a nice looking one if we might add. On the back, we can find a fully articulated 3 inch 1,040,000 pixel resolution TFT LCD that is also a touchscreen. The camera is also equipped with an electronic viewfinder that sports a resolution of 1,440,000 dots, 100% coverage and a magnification of 0.7x. Maximum shutter speeds range from 60 seconds to 1/16000 of a second while the ISO range is from 100 to 6400. The AF system in the FZ300 has also received a major improvement adding Panasonic's Depth Of Defocus technology into the mix for faster focusing speed and improved subject tracking.

One thing you still won't find in many cameras of this price is the 4K resolution video recording making it another feature on the FZ300 that stands out. Panasonic added some useful features to video recordings itself like continuous AF, full manual control, zebra stripes and more. The bit-rate at which the video is recorded is a very high 100 Mbps, very impressive for a camera of this type. There are also two additional resolutions available; 1080p at 60 fps or 720p at 120 fps. Panasonic also added one feature for those people who still think that 4K video is unnecessary and that's the ability to save any frame of your 4K videos as a separate 8-megapixel photo essentially giving you a burst rate of 30 frames per second.

If you don't like the reduction in the resolution you can always use the regular burst rate of 12 frames per second. For those who take their video recording more seriously, Panasonic also included a microphone jack. Lastly, you'll get built-in Wi-Fi, orientation sensor, and mini-HDMI port.
Panasonic Lumix G7Go to Amazon
Next, comes the most affordable interchangeable lens camera on this list, but it's not a budged product by any means.
Overall rating:
80
Size:
0
75
100
Design:
0
95
100
Price:
0
70
100
Ease of Use:
0
80
100
Pros
  • 4K Video/Photo
  • Touchscreen Display
  • Comfortable grip
  • Excelent EVF
  • Wi-Fi capable
  • In-camera RAW conversion
  • Continuous AF
Cons
  • Limited battery life
  • Buttons can get sticky to handle
  • Wi-Fi settings may seem too complex
Click to read the full Review
The G7 is a Micro Four Thirds mirrorless camera in an SLR body. It sports a 16 megapixel Four Thirds sensor in a form factor that's pretty comfortable to use. The AF system in the G7 consists of 49 focus points and coupled with the burst rate of 7 frames per second provides a good and speedy combo no matter the situation you find yourself in.

For your framing and viewing needs, there is a fully articulated 3 inch TFT LCD touchscreen with a resolution of 1,040,000 dots and an electronic viewfinder with a 100% coverage and a resolution of 2,360,000 dots. It's good to see that Panasonic kept to their high standards in this aspect as well. It's also good to see that they care a lot about video in their cameras because the G7 is equipped with 4K video recording capability as well as the microphone jack.

The video quality itself is great and we have no complaints here. The usefulness of this camera as a video recording tool is increased with the addition of zebra patterns, focus peaking, and continuous AF. We usually don't dwell too deeply into the Wi-Fi capabilities of a camera, but we will in this case since the G7 offers some features that are rarely seen on other cameras. Besides offering the usual features as remotely controlling the camera via your smartphone or a tablet or transferring your images to them you'll also get other options like posting your photos to a social site of your choice or backing them up automatically to your computer or a server.

The image quality this camera brings is up to par with the other Micro Four Thirds cameras sporting this sensor and could even be compared to some cameras with APS-C sensors. It produces sharp images with natural colors most of the time and even the high ISO performance isn't bad. Panasonic has really done a great job with JPEG algorithms on the G7 since they produce pleasant looking images in almost every situation, even in low light.

Again, when it comes to dynamic range, the G7 produces results comparable to the competition and leaves plenty of room to salvage detail from your highlights and shadows. While it's not as good as Nikon's DSLRs in this aspect or in noise performance, interestingly enough it easily achieves the performance of the Canon 750/760 series of DSLRs, which is a very impressive result considering the smaller sensor size.

One thing you should be aware of that it's a little more sensitive to lower shutter speeds than some of the other cameras we've tested, meaning that some softness could creep in some of your images even though you've selected a fast enough shutter speed for handheld shooting. You can solve this problem easily by switching to electronic shutter, so keep that in mind when you are shooting at low shutter speeds without a tripod.

In the end, the G7 provides a very good deal for anyone interested in the Four Thirds system of cameras and who wants the ruggedness, manual controls and the feel in the hand that you get with an SLR but still wants a camera that isn't as heavy as APS-C or full frame DSLRs. No matter if your interested in shooting photos or videos the G7 will have you covered in both ways.
Panasonic Lumix LX100Go to Amazon
Now prepare for something really interesting and unique. Have you ever wondered how far can we go in combining a large image sensor and a zoom lens on a compact camera? Well, the answer lies right in front of you or rather in the text you're about to read.
Overall rating:
81
Size:
0
90
100
Design:
0
92
100
Price:
0
60
100
Ease of Use:
0
80
100
Pros
  • 4K Video/Photo
  • Wi-Fi capable
  • Good Image-Stabilization system
  • Comfortable controls
Cons
  • Poor mpx count
  • Lack of ND filter
  • Limited lens range
  • Noise can be noticeable at low ISO values
Click to read the full Review
This latest camera in the LX series comes equipped with a 16 megapixel Four Thirds sensor (yes, you've read it right, it's not a typo) and a 24-75mm equivalent lens with a maximum aperture of f1.7. Unfortunately, you can't use the whole area of the sensor which makes it 1.5 times larger than the more common 1-inch sensors instead of 2 times but that caveat comes with an interesting feature; a multi-aspect ratio option.

Basically, instead of digitally cropping into an already taken photo to achieve different aspect ratios, the LX100 crops directly from the large area of the sensor and thus giving you a more creative way to change your aspect ratio with a hardware switch that's integrated into the lens of the camera. The lens is also optically stabilized which in combination with the large sensor and wide maximum aperture brings a really good low light performance and also quite a lot of room to play with your depth of field.

As you would expect for such an advanced camera, the image quality in regular light conditions is nothing short of excellent. You really get the maximum out of LX100's sensor with great sharpness all around which is a result of Panasonic's mature JPEG algorithms and the lack of AA filter. The dynamic range, however, is pretty average and could be better for such a large sensor. When talking about image quality we should also mention the quality of video recording.

Like with most of their upper range cameras, Panasonic also included 4K video recording here and one that is of very good quality indeed. You don't get many advanced features like on their G-series of cameras, but there are still some useful features here like focus peaking, zebra patterns and the ability to save any frame from your 4K videos as an 8-megapixel photo. The body of the LX100 is pretty sturdy and comfortable for the camera of its size being made out of aluminum and sporting a grip that protrudes from the camera's body enough that you can hold the camera very securely with no fear of dropping it.

On the back of the body, you will find an LCD with a resolution of 921,000 dots and a high resolution 2,760,000 dots electronic viewfinder that is the same as the one on the Panasonic GX7. The screen itself is of average quality for this camera class but luckily the viewfinder is much more impressive and in our opinion more important anyway, so it's good that Panasonic hasn't compromised there.

The native ISO range of 200-25600 is pretty wide for a Micro Four Thirds camera and LX100 provides you with very usable images at higher ISOs up to ISO 6400. The maximum burst rate of 11 fps(6.5 with continuous AF turned on) is also very respectable and useful for any situation where you need to capture fast movement. The AF system in the LX100 should serve you well in those situations; it's not the best performance you can get in a mirrorless camera, but it still sits comfortably above the average.

In the end, as the icing on the cake, you'll get great Wi-Fi capabilities that are even more useful with the addition of NFC. Using the official app on your smartphone you can do things like remotely controlling your camera, posting photos on social networks or automatically backing them up to your PC.
Panasonic Lumix GX85Go to Amazon
Well, here is yet another camera on this list that uses the ever popular 16 megapixel Micro Four Thirds sensor.
Overall rating:
82
Size:
0
92
100
Design:
0
98
100
Price:
0
55
100
Ease of Use:
0
82
100
Pros
  • Tiltable LCD screen
  • 4K Video/Photo
  • Customizable inteface
  • Wi-Fi capable
  • Touchpad AF
  • Post Focus
Cons
  • Expensive
  • No weather sealing
  • Battery charger not included
  • Small back control dial
Click to read the full Review
It's interesting to see a new camera like the GX85 not sporting a newer 20 megapixels 4/3 sensor now already found in some cameras but we still won't complain much because the 16 megapixel one is still very good even by today's standards. To make sure that you get the most sharpness out of that sensor Panasonic decided to remove the AA filter, which is a welcome move that we didn't expect.

When you hold it in your hand you will notice that it sports just the right size and the weight for a camera of this type and every dial and button is nicely laid out. The materials used are a combination of sturdy plastic and faux leather; not very premium per say, but not bad either. The screen and the viewfinder on this camera are both really good. They both sport respectable resolutions and the screen itself is also a touchscreen making it great for doing things like focusing or navigation through the menus.

One very impressive thing about the GX85 is the in-body stabilization. First, you have the built-in 5-axis stabilization that works both for video and stills and generally works really good. If that isn't enough for you and you find yourself in a demanding situation you also get the option to combine both the in-body stabilization and the stabilization of your lens with a technology that Panasonic calls Dual I.S. We wouldn't blame you if you thought this was some kind of a gimmick, but surprisingly enough it really does work.

Continuing with the very positive vibe that surrounds this camera, let's say a few things about the image quality you can expect to get out of it. We can say, without any hesitation, that the image quality is great! The photos that this camera produces came out sharp, with vibrant colors, low noise, and good dynamic range. The high ISO performance up to 1600 is very clean and quite usable until about 6400. That's an impressive performance for a camera that comes with a 4/3 inch sensor.

Video quality is also great with the resolution maxing out at 4K at 30 frames per second. We do miss the headphone and microphone jacks for true video recording experience, but it's quite obvious that this camera was primarily built to be a still camera first and video camera second. If audio isn’t your main concern in your videos, you will enjoy recording them with the GX85 because of some other useful features like focus peaking, zebra patterns, creative filters and the option to convert frames in your videos into 8-megapixel stills. We should also mention that the AF system in the GX85 is another positive thing about it.

It’s Panasonic's relatively new Depth from Defocus autofocus system and it works great in combination with the responsive touchscreen giving you an easy, fast and reliable way to acquire focus in any situation. It also works pretty well in low light conditions. Another thing that goes well with the speedy nature of GX85 is it's burst rate; you get 8 frames per second without AF and 6 frames per second with continuous AF turned on.

The only area where the GX85 doesn't shine is when it comes to battery life. The expected battery life is rated at around 290 shots, which is less than both the GX7 and the GX8. So, just plan ahead and carry a spare battery whenever you can and you will enjoy this little camera immensely.
Panasonic Lumix FZ1000Go to Amazon
If you thought that Lumix FZ300 was impressive and you are really interested in a bridge SLR camera but you really crave a larger sensor, than the FZ1000 should be on the top of your list.
Overall rating:
82
Size:
0
72
100
Design:
0
86
100
Price:
0
78
100
Ease of Use:
0
90
100
Pros
  • In-camera Raw conversion
  • Clean HDMI output
  • Electronic shutter
  • 4K Video
  • Zoom/focus ring around lens
  • Bright F2.8-4 lens (25-400mm equiv. range)
Cons
  • Bulky
  • Expensive
  • Lacks built-in ND filter
  • No Auto-ISO in Video Mode
Click to read the full Review
Inside it lies a 20 megapixel 1 inch MOS sensor and on top of it sits a 25-400mm equivalent lens with an f2.8 aperture at it's widest and f4 at its longest end. This doesn't sound as impressive as the zoom range and the constant f2.8 aperture on the FZ1000, but it's till great considering we are dealing with a much larger sensor and therefore the camera lens itself would need to be much bigger and bulkier to achieve the same.

This may be a bridge SLR camera and not the compact one but nevertheless, the size and the weight of the camera still play a role here and Panasonic needed to balance out both the specifications of the lens and the overall size of the camera body. To help you get steady and sharp pictures Panasonic also included the 5-axis Power OIS stabilization. The lens also features a useful Zoom/Focus switch which lets you use the ring around it either for zooming in/out or manual focusing.

The body of the FZ1000 is mostly made out of plastic with some parts being made out of metal. The feeling in the hand is rather good despite it being quite large for a 1-inch sensor camera. There's also no weather sealing, but even without it, the camera feels rugged enough. On the back of the FZ1000, you'll find the usual arrangement of buttons for a Panasonic camera and also a high-resolution electronic viewfinder together with a fully articulated TFT LCD screen with a resolution of 921,000 dots. It would be great if Panasonic decided to use a touchscreen, but at least the viewfinder is superb and without compromise. Fortunately, the menus and the onscreen controls are well laid out and easy to navigate. The performance, in general, is very impressive considering how much tech is crammed in this camera. Whatever you do with it you'll always feel like you've bought a lot more expensive camera because of how fast it is.

The AF system in the FZ1000 also falls into this category, being very responsive indeed due to Depth from Defocus technology behind it. The Story with the burst rate is no different, you get 12 fps without continuous AF and 7 fps with continuous AF turned on; both are impressive values for this kind of camera. Now, on to photo and video quality. Even without the convenience of such an impressive lens, the image quality of FZ1000 is really good. At lower ISOs, there's no noticeable noise and you can safely push your ISO to 3200 and you'll still get very usable images. JPEGs are generally fine, with mature processing and no sharpening and noise reduction artifacts to be found most of the time. You'll only want to switch to RAW at highest ISO values or when you need to squeeze the maximum amount of dynamic range from the sensor. The same can be said for video quality. You'll get a lot of different resolutions and framerates to fiddle with but you'll mostly be using either the 4K 30 fps mode or the 1080p at 60/30 fps.

There is also a microphone port for all of you audio junkies and also a microHDMI port as an easy way to view your photos and videos on a big screen.
Panasonic Lumix GX8Go to Amazon
We've reached the last tree cameras on this list, so prepare for some very exciting stuff. The GX8 is currently Panasonic's best Micro Four Thirds camera that comes in a compact form factor.
Overall rating:
77
Size:
0
95
100
Design:
0
82
100
Price:
0
40
100
Ease of Use:
0
91
100
Pros
  • 4K Video/Photo
  • Wi-Fi capable
  • Weather-sealed
  • Touchpad AF
  • Post Focus
  • Highly customizable interface
Cons
  • Can't rotate rear screen upward with external mic or HDMI cable attached
  • Expensive
  • Washed colors in JPEG
Click to read the full Review
Like you would expect from a high-end camera, two things that immediately stand out when you take a look at it are its design and specs sheet. It sports a weatherproof magnesium alloy body with some leather accents on the front and on its grip and it all looks very sharp and stylish, especially the all black model.

On the top of the camera, you'll find two dials, one that is a combo of a mode dial and an exposure compensation dial and one that is used for changing various settings like ISO, aperture or shutter speed. Looking at the back, we are getting the first glimpse of GX8's impressive specs. First, there's the viewfinder. It's a 2,360,000 dots OLED EVF that's can also tilt up and down; a really nice touch by Panasonic that makes this camera stand out even more. The screen unit is also an impressive one that is also articulated and of high resolution in addition to being a touchscreen.

Talking of camera's internals, there's a lot to mention. The first thing you'll probably notice on the specs sheet is the new 20-megapixel sensor. Yes, we've finally moved away from the 16-megapixel sensor that has been a sensor of choice for many cameras so far and while still being good it really needed an upgrade. When we compare the image quality to its predecessor, the GX7, we are happy to say that the new sensor does indeed bring some improvements. The sharpness is about the same as on the GX7 but with added detail due to the increase of the resolution.

One impressive thing is that the noise performance is virtually unchanged and still quite good despite the GX8 having a smaller pixel size due to having a larger resolution to work with. There are also some differences in JPEG processing when it comes to colors and contrast, but we won't even touch on those; if you really care about the quality of your photos from every aspect, you will use RAW anyway. When it comes to video quality, you should only know that It's on a very high level. You get the option to record 4K videos at 30 fps and at a bitrate of 100 Mbps or Full HD videos at 60 or 30 fps at the bitrates of 28 or 20 Mbps. In addition to having great looking videos, the GX8 also adds a lot of features to those videos like focus peaking, zebra patterns, microphone level adjustments or 8-megapixel snapshots.

While the integrated stereo microphones aren’t too shabby, it's also important to add that there's a microphone jack available for those that deeply care for their audio. When it comes to autofocus, the GX8 sports Panasonic's familiar 49-point AF system that really shines due to Depth from Defocus technology. It really goes hand it hand with the burst rate of 10 frames per second making the GX8 a really great camera for any occasion that requires a fast operation and reliable AF. Lastly, there's the Dual IS technology which combines both the sensor-shift in-body stabilization and lens-shift stabilization in the lens giving you even steadier photos and videos than ever before.
Panasonic Lumix GH4Go to Amazon
Now, on to the last and predictable item on our list, the Panasonic DMC-GH4. We know that many of you would expect something newer to reach the top spot, but the truth is that the GH4 is still the king when it comes to overall package if offers.
Overall rating:
67
Size:
0
72
100
Design:
0
80
100
Price:
0
30
100
Ease of Use:
0
87
100
Pros
  • Wi-Fi Capable
  • Good battery life
  • Good range of support tools
  • Touchscreen
  • DFD system
  • 4K Video
Cons
  • Expensive
  • Wi-Fi can be hard to configurate
  • Focus tracking experiences issues for subject identification
Click to read the full Review
It's built around the well familiar and proven 16 megapixels Four-Thirds sensor. With 20 megapixels Four-Thirds sensor already on the market it isn't the most up to date offering you can get, but the truth of the matter is that it really doesn't need it for the purpose it was made and it's mainly for video recording.

The new sensor would only bring more resolution for photos but it really doesn't add much when it comes to dynamic range or noise performance which are far more important for video. Nevertheless, you can still take some pretty nice photos with the GH4, with good dynamic range and very low noise up to ISO 3200. You also get the added benefit of the SLR body and all the manual control that goes with it to help you adjust the right settings when you need them.

The body itself is made out of magnesium alloy and literally screams high quality no matter at what angle you look at it. It's also quite comfortable to use and sports a very deep grip so you will have no problem in holding it securely. Also, all the dials and buttons are in their right places and very easy to reach making the GH4 a real joy to shoot with. The story doesn't change in regard to what's at your disposal when it comes to the screen and the viewfinder.

The screen itself is a fully articulated touchscreen OLED unit with a resolution of 1,036,000 dots while the EVF sports a resolution of 2,359,000 dots and a magnification of 0.67x. The AF system in the GH4 is the same found in all of the Panasonic's high-end cameras and it's the 49-point system with Depth from Defocus technology. Like in all the other cameras with this system the performance is great no matter what you throw at it.

The overall performance of the camera during use is excellent; everything from cycling through the menus, turning it on/off and shot to shot times performs admirably. The same can be said about its burst rate; it sits comfortably at 12 frames per second without focus. Even the buffer sizes are quite good with a maximum of 144 shots at JPEG or 35 RAW shots before the buffer gets full. In the end, let's finally touch on the GH4's main selling point, it's video capabilities. Resolution wise, you get the option to shoot either in 4K at 30 fps or 1080p at 24, 30 or 60 fps. There's also an extensive codec support with formats such as AVCHD, MP4 and MOV. Everyone who grades their videos in post processing will be pleased with the addition of Cinelike D and Cinelike D color modes as well as the option to purchase the V-log profile firmware update separately for even more control and increased dynamic range. The list of functions and options for video is quite long and technical so we will mention just of few them that most of the people will recognize. Among others, you'll get focus peaking, zebra exposure patterns, audio level control, time code recording, black level control and luminance range options.

Another interesting thing is the optional DMW-YAGH module that adds XLR inputs, SDI modules, time code input and even a full-sized HDMI port. This addon will surely be useful for anyone who takes their video work very seriously and needs all the inputs and ports he can get. All this serves as a proof of how relevant and powerful the GH4 still is and that it still has its place in Panasonic's line-up. Until the GH5 arrives in 2017 anyway.

Selection Criteria

There are a lot of important factors to consider when complaining a list like this one and picking the best cameras out of the bunch isn’t always an easy thing to do. The first thing we had to do is to figure out the most logical way to separate each camera into a set number of points that perfectly describe its feature set and overall capabilities. After a long thought process, we decided on a list of nine most important factors that will allow us to easily differentiate one camera from another and let you choose the best one for you with more ease. Let us examine each of those in more detail, so you can get a better understanding of how we decided what cameras deserve to be on this list.

Design – While it may sound like something that is purely subjective and only relates to how good are the looks of a particular camera, it is also something that relates to how its built and is it comfortable to use. It’s important to find a camera which has the right balance between an attractive design and comfort, but since your camera is primarily a tool for taking photos and videos we will always favor functionality over good looks in our reviews.

Price/Product rate – It’s true that there is a number of professional users out there who aren’t worrying too much about the asking price for their cameras because they need the best of the best for their work and can’t satisfy with anything less. Most of the users, however, are always on a look out for a product with great price to features ratio and we will gladly help them in making the right decision. When choosing a camera to feature on a particular list, we are always looking for a product that offers enough compelling features no matter its price point, so the end user ultimately feels happy about their purchase and that they are sure that their hard-earned money was well spent.

Weight – While it’s not the most important factor when choosing a new camera, it certainly is when you’re buying one that you’re planning to carry with you often or if you’re, for example, travelling a lot and you don’t want to be burdened by the weight of your camera too much and enjoy your trip instead. This is especially important in the case of a compact and mirrorless camera, where portability is one of their main selling points. You also need to take into account the build quality, which will also add some grams to the total weight of the camera. So, you’ll need to decide if you want a camera that’s lighter and easier to work with or you want a more durable and substantial camera that will be slightly less portable.

Waterproof capabilities – Protection from the elements may not be the first thing on someone’s mind when buying a device with electronics inside of it, but many advanced and professional users who are always shooting in different weather conditions find this an important factor when buying a new camera. To keep things in the right perspective, we usually won’t judge an entry-level or even a mid-range camera on the account of its water or dust proof capabilities, but we certainly will for a more expensive one where it’s expected that it has enough protection to be able to withstand any shooting scenario you throw at it and work its magic any time of the day.

Grip – One of the most important things to consider about your new potential purchase. It’s of utmost importance that the camera is designed in a way that it fits comfortably and securely in your hand without any chance of being dropped while you’re shooting with it or simply holding it while walking or taking a look at the scenery. This is where some manufacturers drop the ball when designing a camera with

all metal or all plastic construction, but without the necessary parts that provide a good grip like some rubber or faux leather accents on the front and the back of the camera. What’s also important, especially with larger cameras, is that it has a deep enough grip on its front and the one that allows for your fingers to comfortably wrap around it and allow you to hold your camera with confidence and without the fear of dropping it.

Image quality – This is possibly one of the main reasons to why someone decides to buy a dedicated camera. While there are many other benefits to buying a camera, as stated on this list of different metrics, image quality may be the one that takes the cake. It’s true that our smartphones have become very capable in taking decent looking photos and videos, but a lot of them still haven’t come close to most compact cameras in terms of image quality, let alone more advanced ones. So, there’s a big chance that you’re looking into buying a dedicated camera to get even better quality photos or videos and you’ll want to know how capable each model of camera is in this regard. When examining image quality of a particular camera we are always taking into account things like sharpness, color balance, noise performance, dynamic range, JPEG algorithms, lens quality and sometimes even of features that allow you to tinker with the look of your photos directly from the camera itself like different filers and picture styles. You can rest assured that you’ll easily be able to pick a camera from our list if image quality is one of your most important factors when buying a new camera.

Adaptability – The importance of adaptability varies from one type of camera to another and so does its importance as a factor to take into account when purchasing a new camera. So, it depends if you’re buying, for example, a compact camera which usually isn’t very expandable and are made to work out of the box and with almost no input from the users aside from using the camera. On the other hand, mirrorless cameras and DSLRs are a completely different story. It’s important that they don’t come with proprietary, but with universally compatible connectors for accessories like flashes, microphones, headphones or memory cards, so a lot of choices can be given to users in choosing the right one for them. Even more important is the choice of lenses that are given at your disposal. While most of the camera manufacturers offer a decent selection of first-party lenses, some of them don’t offer much in terms of alternatives coming from third-party companies. We will certainly take something like into account when choosing the right camera for you and make sure you’ll cover as much as possible in this regard.

Ease of use – Making an intuitive user interface that’s easy to navigate and a control layout that won’t require you to relearn everything you already know about using a camera should be a top priority for every camera manufacturer out there; yet, it isn’t. For this reason, we will always carefully examine each and every camera and make sure that using it won’t become a chore no matter if you’re a beginner or an advanced user. We will also see how much the camera offers in terms of customization and how well it can adapt to your certain needs. This is especially important for mid-range cameras and above, where having a lot of programmable controls and different quick menus is always a desirable thing to have. If we’re talking about a beginner’s camera, we will make sure it has enough modes and features that will help you learn your way around photography and figure out how a particular camera works. No matter the camera type, this is certainly one of the most important things to look for and we’ve certainly got you covered.

Availability – Since we are always dealing with products that come from very respectable and globally familiar brands, availability often isn’t a big issue, except in the case where the camera becomes outdated and it stops being manufactured. When that happens, we’ll make sure to update our articles to bring you the newest models possible, so this potential problem can be avoided in its entirety. Other than that, all of our cameras can easily be purchased online and so can every important piece of gear that they can be equipped with.

So there you go, these are the Panasonic cameras that should get your immediate attention. If you’re in a market for a camera that has both the image quality and a solid list of features that each of these eight cameras should fit your needs. You can’t go wrong with either one of them. It just goes to show how Panasonic stepped up their game in the last few years and now stands among the top camera manufacturers of all times.

FAQs

What’s the best Panasonic camera of this list?

Well, that depends on what you need a camera for. If you happen to be a casual photographer, then your best shot would be the Lumix LX100 – portable, easy to use, and the price/quality ratio isn’t that bad. If, instead, you desire to work as a professional, then go straight ahead for the Lumix GH4, the king among Panasonic cameras.

I’m looking for a camera with a good battery life, mostly for travel photography. Which one would be the best pick?

Certainly, go for the Lumix FZ1000. Though the Lumix GX8 does a superb job, the washed out JPEG output won’t be your best friend unless you are willing to spend a good time in post-production work. The Lumix FZ1000 offers an in-camera RAW conversion, ideal for preserving details, with a 25-400mm lens equivalent.

How does the built-in ND Filter benefit my job?

ND Filters, which stands for Neutral Density Filters, are a must-have resource for any serious landscape photographer. The purpose of this tool is to reduce the amount of light entering our lenses, which as a consequence allows us to work with certain special combinations of aperture and shutter speed that, under normal conditions, would overexpose our photos.

Why are Panasonic cameras way more expensive than other brands?

Panasonic, though expensive, aren’t the worst to label under this category – Leica does have that sole achievement – but the reason for this can be answered because of the manufacturer’s cost to produce such a quality product (and let’s face it that Panasonic doesn’t have such a bulk level of orders as Nikon and Canon), but also due to the technology introduced with each product: ND filters in lenses, 4K video quality, etc.

You might also want to check out other Panasonic Lumix DC-GX9 Review and Panasonic Lumix ZS50 Review that didn’t make the cut but are as good as some of these Panasonic Lumix models.

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Igor Letilovic

Igor Letilovic

An amateur photographer, songwriter, musician, computer and technology geek and an occasional comedian, I'm a little bit of everything. I always aim to pursue things I'm passonate about and try to look on the positive side of things whenever I can. My mission is to wrap my articles in that aura of positive energy and keep a healthy balance between being serious about my work and spicing things up with a little fun now and than. After all, life's a game and there's always a different way to play it.

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