Best Canon Cameras Reviewed & Tested

Rating: 5.00 based on 1 Rating
Anes Mulalic
September 18, 2017 By Anes Mulalic
Best Canon Cameras Reviewed & Tested www.sleeklens.com

It’s 2018, the winter has passed, the weather is clearing up and it’s time for consumers and professionals alike to freshen up on the latest and best offers of their favorite camera brand – Canon. We have prepared for you a series of comprehensive reviews for the best Canon cameras for 2018.

Our Top 3 Picks

 
Canon EOS 80D
  • Canon EOS 80D
  • 5 out of 5
    Our rating
  • Fast & accurate AF
  • Price: See Here
Canon EOS M6
  • Canon EOS M6
  • 4.5 out of 5
    Our rating
  • FullHD Recording
  • Price: See Here
Canon EOS M10
  • Canon EOS M10
  • 4.3 out of 5
    Our rating
  • Great for beginners
  • Price: See Here

We have chosen the best of mirrorless, DSLR, and Point-and-Shoot cameras by taking into consideration the needs of modern amateurs, enthusiasts and professionals. Whether you need mobility, versatility, image quality, performance, durability, connectivity or ruggedness, Canon has provided a lot to choose from, and we have narrowed down this list for you based on what we think are the best value cameras.

11 Best Canon Cameras

 

Canon EOS 80D: An enthusiast approachGo to Amazon
The Canon EOS 80D is a mid-range, enthusiast-level DSLR camera from Canon released in 2016. It features a 24MP APS-C CMOS sensor, Dual Pixel CMOS AF system which is known to be responsible for fast and accurate autofocus performance in Live View. The 80D represents a middle ground between the power of manual control and ease of use. It tries to do both by providing users with advanced features in a simple manner. This is helped by a 3-inch LCD touchscreen which can be flipped and rotated by 180°. This camera is a successor and a worthy upgrade to the Canon EOS 70D because it brings considerable improvements in areas such as ISO performance, dynamic range and autofocus, among others.
Overall rating:
84
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Pros
  • Built-in WiFi
  • NFC Connectivity
  • Articulating Screen
  • FullHD Video Recording
  • Optical Built-in Viewfinder
  • Face Detection Focusing
  • Long Battery Life
  • External Microphone Port
  • External Headphone Port
  • Environmental Sealing
  • Timelapse Recording
Cons
  • Heavy Body
  • No Image Stabilization
Click to read the full Review
The body of Canon 80D consists of a magnesium-alloy chassis and a polycarbonate outer shell. Its full dimensions are 5.5 x 4.1 x 3.1 in (139 x 105 x 79 mm). It is quite hefty at 730g but this is still relatively light compared to the more professionally oriented 7D Mark II which weighs 930g. Its design is barely distinguishable from its predecessor, offering a medium-sized DSLR body with a deep and comfortable grip. The 80D is resistant to moisture and dust, but not water-proof.

Just like 70D and those before it, the 80D features a small LCD display on the top plate for quick access to info about shooting parameters. This display is accompanied by dedicated buttons for choosing between different AF modes, shooting modes, ISO and metering. Once you press one of these buttons you can control their settings by turning the wheel located just above the shutter button. If you turn the wheel alone, without previously pressing a button, it will control shutter speed. Aperture is controlled by a secondary wheel on the rear. This small LCD can also be backlit by pressing the light bulb icon sitting next to it.

The main mode dial is located on the top left side of the camera and there you can find all the standard shooting modes along with two custom modes (C1 and C2) in case you would like to pre-program some settings you use consistently. Moving on to the rear of the camera we discover a standard set of buttons for accessing media, switching between video and still photo mode, quick settings access (Q), main menu and others. The LCD on the back is a very responsive touchscreen with a resolution of 1040K dots. You can flip it out and then rotate it by 180 degrees either for selfies or simply to close the door so that the screen faces outwards.

Performance and Image quality

The 80D is powered by DIGIC 6 image processor which provides fast and responsive performance across the camera. It is also responsible for capturing photos in burst mode of 7FPS. The new Dual Pixel CMOS AF system on the 80D got a nice upgrade of 49 AF points, all of which are cross-type. Therefore, the 80D performs much faster in terms of focusing speed both in Live View and through the viewfinder. You are presented with several different modes when it comes to choosing between all these focus points. You can choose for the camera to automatically use all of them, you can select a specific group of points or you can choose a single AF points to use.

ISO range gains a small boost in the native range, with maximum ISO now being ISO1600, compared to ISO12800 in the 70D. The expanded ISO range remains the same at maximum ISO25600. JPEG stills produced by Canon 80D are very sharp, as we are used to seeing from Canon. However, sharpening and noise-reduction algorithms are more aggressive compared to the 70D. This means that while the 80D will keep noise in check all the way up to ISO6400, we will see considerable detail smudging at ISO3200 and above. On the other hand, we are seeing significant improvement with 80D when it comes to dynamic range, especially dynamic range in raw files. In fact, we believe the 80D has the best dynamic range performance of any Canon APS-C camera.

Being an all-around DSLR, kind of a hybrid in all aspects, Canon has decided to put more muscle into the video department this time around.  While there is no 4K video, you will still be able to record 1080p at 60FPS for those slow-motion moments. Videographers will be happy to know Canon has now included a headphone and a microphone jack as well. Among other additions is the built-in HDR and time-lapse video modes.

Connectivity-wise, we still have the built-in Wi-Fi we’ve seen on 70D, for easy photo and video sharing and remote camera control. What is new is the addition of NFC (Near Field Technology) which makes it a lot faster to establish a Wi-Fi connection between the camera and other smart devices.

Conclusion

To conclude, it is clear that Canon has put in a lot of effort into making its newest mid-range DSLR an excellent option for an all-purpose DSLR, including putting more focus on video features than ever before. With a 24-million-pixel sensor, fast and reliable AF system, an easy-to-use touchscreen interface, lots of manual controls and an excellent battery life, the 80D is sure to attract many customers.

Canon EOS M6Go to Amazon
Canon EOS M6 is the latest Mirrorless camera from Canon and a successor to the Canon EOS M3. The EOS M6 is an enthusiast-friendly shooter with the same sensor as the one in Canon EOS M5, a 24.2 MP APS-C CMOS sensor. Being an APS-C in a Canon camera means this sensor has a crop factor of 1.6x, compared to 1.5x crop factor in Nikon Cameras. Even though the M6 is here to replace the M3, it can easily claim the throne of its older and bigger brother, the M5, too. It has the same Hybrid Dual Pixel CMOS AF system we have seen on the M5 and 80D, the same DIGIC 7 image processor. In fact, the only thing missing from the M5 is the EVF (Electronic Viewfinder). Now, before you jump to say how this is a major drawback, you should know that the M6 supports an optional EVF which can be purchased separately.
Overall rating:
83
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Image Quality:
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74
100
Portability:
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95
100
Pros
  • Built-in WiFi
  • Bluetooth Connectivity
  • NFC Connectivity
  • Articulating Screen
  • Touch Screen
  • FullHD Recording
  • External Microphone Port
  • Remote Control via Smartphone
Cons
  • Low Battery Life
  • No Image Stabilization
  • No Built-in Viewfinder
  • No Weather-Sealed
Click to read the full Review
The Canon EOS M5 is smaller and lighter than the M5, but being made from the same quality materials it is just as sturdy. Overall feel of the camera is very nice. Being a compact camera, you can shoot using only one hand, as long as the lens is not too big. Most of the controls are situated at the right corner of the top plate. What we have here are to physical control dials, one for choosing between main shooting modes and another one for exposure compensation. Just above those we have a ‘M-Fn’ customizable button and a large shutter button sitting at a slightly forward-facing angle. The controls are not too crammed despite the reduced size of the camera and are easy to get used to.

On the rear, we have a 3-inch tiltable LCD touchscreen with a resolution of just above 1m dots. The M5 which has a 3.2-inch 1.6m dot LCD screen. As you can see, the screen on the M6 is slightly reduced in size and resolution. Along with the (lack of) built-in EVF, these are the only differences between the two. The rear of the camera also featured a standard set of buttons for this class of camera. There is a four-way navigation controller, along with dedicated buttons for image information, accessing media, main menu and a dedicated video recording button.

Performance and image quality

Performance-wise, the M6 is as fast as the M5 and generally competitive against rival Mirrorless cameras from other manufacturers. As we previously mentioned, it boasts a dual-pixel CMOS AF system with all AF points being cross-type. Coupled with the new DIGIC 7 processor, this allow for a very fast and accurate autofocus performance. In burst mode, the EOS M6 can shoot up to 7FPS with continuous focusing for each frame, or 9FPS without continuous AF. This is the same performance we’ve seen with Canon EOS M5 and at the same time greatly improved compared to Canon EOS M3 which could only do 4.2FPS. The buffer in the burst mode tops at 17 RAW and 26 JPEG images. The native ISO range is again the same as with the M5, ranging from ISO100 – ISO25600. This is an improvement over the M3 which could only go as high as IS12800.

The sensor inside the M6 is the same 24.2 MP CMOS as in the M5 and most likely the same one used in the Canon 80D DSLR. This means you will get very clear, very sharp images, improved dynamic range over the M3 and generally good color reproduction and white balance accuracy.

Canon continues to be shy when it comes video, at least in terms of resolution. There is no 4K od 2.7K video recording, instead of allowing for 1080p at 60FPS at best. This is still an improvement over the M3 which could only do Full HD at 30FPS. All videos are recorded in MP4 format which is optimized for web sharing. There is no headphone jack but an external microphone port is available. The video is stabilized using an In-Body 5-axis Electronic stabilization.

Conclusion

Out of the box, technically looking, you could say Canon EOS M5 still sits at the top of Canon’s Mirrorless range of cameras. However, the only notable differences between the M5 and M6 are in that M5 has a higher resolution screen and the M6 doesn’t have a built-in viewfinder. But, considering the screen quality and resolution of the M6 screen is still more than adequate for any enthusiast-level user, we won’t count this as a serious downside. Even though the M6 doesn’t have a built-in viewfinder, you can still order one separately and install it on the top hot shoe on the M6. If you do buy the Canon EOS M6 along with the new EVF-DC2 from Canon, you will still come out with spending less money compared to what the M5 would cost. This is why we choose the M6 as the best Canon mirrorless camera in 2017. You will get all the benefits of M5 in a smaller, lighter body and for less money.

Canon EOS M10Go to Amazon
The EOS M10 is an entry-level mirrorless camera released by Canon in 2015. It was released in 2015. but remains a viable option for amateurs and enthusiasts looking for a modern and an affordable camera in 2017. Inside the M10, there is an 18-megapixel APS-C CMOS sensor –the same one found in Canon EOS 700D DSLR. Along with this sensor comes a Hybrid CMOS AF II autofocus system, with 49 AF points.

As the line between Compact System Cameras (CSC) and traditional DSLRs becomes more blurred with each year, and the competition of the like of Fuji are pushing their Mirrorless camera solutions aggressively, Canon has found itself in a bit of pickle in this market. With the release of M5 and  now the M6, Canon has finally shown they are serious about mirrorless as well.

However, the enthusiast and professional-level mirrorless cameras from Fuji and Sony present fierce competition to Canon, which is still lagging in some areas such as video recording capabilities.

But the story with the entry-level market is a bit different. Canon has put a lot of goodies in a small body that is Canon M10, and for a very affordable price. Let us inspect in more detail what is on the menu.
Overall rating:
66
Design:
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Image Quality:
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Pros
  • Built-in WiFi
  • NFC Connectivity
  • Articulating Screen
  • FullHD Recording
  • Touch Screen
  • Face Detection Focusing
Cons
  • No Image Stabilization
  • No Built-in Viewfinder
  • No External Viewfinder
  • Low Battery Life
  • No Environmental Sealing
  • Poor Low Light Performance
Click to read the full Review
The M10’s body is made of standard polycarbonate which we have come to expect from cameras in this price range. Build quality is solid, as good as it gets in this class. The design is minimalistic, which is understandable considering the targeted audience. Aesthetically, it looks like something in between a P&S camera and an entry-level DSLR. Despite build materials not being on par with high-end cameras, the M10 still feels very solid in hands.

As with the design, controls are very thin as well. On the top plate, you will find a large shutter button and a smaller, dedicated video recording button to the right of it. There is no main mode dial for choosing between shooting modes such as Tv, Av, Manual, etc. Instead, we have a simple 3-stop lever for choosing between Video, Photo and Automatic Intelligent (A+) modes. The Photo mode is actually how you access the Creative Assist mode, which we’ve originally seen on M3. In the case of the M10, the Creative Assist mode is simplified, and in a good way. Users new to advanced imaging parameters can experiment with different manual settings by touching on-screen sliders while seeing the results in real time. You can fiddle with manual settings such as ISO, aperture and shutter speed but there are also a ton different presets and digital filters to play with.

On the rear plate of the camera, we can see a 3-inch LCD touchscreen with a resolution of 1m dots, which will be your main go-to place for all imaging options and camera settings since manual control buttons are very scarce. The screen can be tilted by 180-degrees upwards, and when fully rotated the camera automatically enters selfie mode. To the right of the screen there is a four-way navigation controller used for navigating media and menus. Each button has a secondary functionality for Exposure, Flash, Image Information and Exposure Lock. Above the circular navigation there is a dedicated MENU button, and just below it there is a button for direct access to media.

Performance and Image quality

The Canon EOS M10 is powered by DIGIC 6 processor, which will allow for a burst rate of 4.6FPS. The inclusion of the DIGIC 6 image processor also enables better handling of noise, compared to the older EOS M and EOS M2 cameras. Native ISO range starts at ISO 100 and tops at ISO12800, with a possibility of extension to ISO25600. In practice, you will be able to take images up to ISO1600 without too much worry over the noise. ISO3200 and above will introduce noticeable noise which may be problematic and warrant some noise reduction in post-processing. The new Hybrid CMOS AF II system is a notable upgrade combining phase-detect and contrast-detect AF points for faster and more accurate focusing. In the video performance area, this camera can record videos up to 1080p Full HD resolution at 30FPS.

The M10 covers all the basic connectivity options which you might expect; with NFC and Wi-Fi available, it is about the same you can find in other competing cameras in this class.

Conclusion

Canon M10 is a very lightweight, compact mirrorless camera designed for beginner and amateur photographers wanting to cross over into interchangeable lens territory. It will deliver excellent image quality and performance for the cost, but we wouldn’t call it an enthusiast’s camera simply because it lacks both manual controls as well as a viewfinder. The features themselves are on par with the competition and nothing more than that, but once you consider the extensive lineup of Canon EF lens which is compatible with this camera via an adapter, it becomes a very versatile option for a very affordable price.

Canon 5D Mark IV: A Full Frame BeastGo to Amazon
The Canon EOS 5D has long been the number one choice for many professional and advanced enthusiast photographers because of its versatility. The last in the line is the new Canon 5D Mark IV. Released in 2016, the 5D Mark IV is a DSLR with a 30MP full-frame sensor. While the design of the body remains largely unchanged from its predecessor, the 5D Mark III, our successor brings a wide range of improvements under the hood. The new sensor delivers a boost in form of an increased megapixel count and the new Dual Pixel AF technology. Other improvements include an LCD with touch sensitivity, 4K video and expanded connectivity with built-in Wi-Fi, NFC and GPS.
Overall rating:
73
Design:
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Image Quality:
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100
Portability:
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51
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Pros
  • Built-in WiFi
  • NFC Connectivity
  • 4K Video Resolution
  • Touch Screen
  • Weather-sealed
  • Optical Built-in Viewfinder
  • Face Detection Focusing
  • 30.0MP - High Resolution Sensor
  • 102.400 Max ISO
  • 61 Focus Points
Cons
  • Heavy Body
  • Expensive
  • No Image Stabilization
  • No Articulating Screen
Click to read the full Review
As we previously stated the body of 5D Mark IV resembles it’s Mark III predecessor in most areas. One notable change to the design is improved sealing around the lens mount, shutter button and battery doors. Small changes like this result in better overall weather-resistance. 5D Mark IV’s chassis is made of aluminium and plastic, with the outer shell being made using magnesium alloy with rubber coating. Canon says this coating has been improved for better resistance to wear.

As for the controls, much of it remains the same as previous 5D models, but also very similar to other Canon DSLR’s such as the mid-range 80D. The top plate is recognizable by a small LCD screen on the right side. Just like with the Mark III and 80D, this screen is used for making quick changes to shooting parameters, in conjunction with dedicated buttons for White Balance/Metering, Drive/AF, Exposure/ISO and a special button for backlighting the screen. On the left side of the top plate, there is a main shooting mode dial which hosts a standard range of shooting modes, including A+, P, Tv, Av, M, B and three custom modes C1, C2 and C3. Just beneath the main mode dial is an On/Off lever for turning the camera on or off.

Moving on the rear of the camera, the first thing to see is a large 3.2-inch LCD touchscreen with 1062K-dot resolution. This resolution is considerably higher than that of Canon 80D and 5D Mark III which only had a 1040K-dot screen. The viewfinder also receives an update in form of an additional LCD layer called Intelligent Viewfinder II, which shows extra information when you’re peeking through it. The viewfinder has 0.71x magnification and 100% coverage. Buttons for media control and options are situated in a vertical column of five buttons to the left of the main LCD screen. On the top right side of the rear panel, we have dedicated buttons for Start/Stop video recording, along with a lever to switch between Still/Video modes. What is new here is the AF area selection button, situated just below AF joystick.

Performance and Image quality

The Canon EOS 5D Mark IV is capable of burst capture of 7FPS (Raw + JPEG) with a buffer limit of 18 shots on SD card and 20 shots on CF card. If you shoot only in JPEGs the buffer is unlimited. Shooting only RAW brings the upper buffer limit up to 28 shots on an SD card and 33 shots on a CF card. This performance is more than suitable for the vast majority of situations and photographers, including weddings, events, wildlife and even sports to a certain degree.

Overall performance is very fluid, with fast start-up, responsive touch screen and snappy menus. Apart from having to wait for a few seconds for the buffer to clear once you fill it, nothing about this camera is going to make you wait.

The sensor inside the 5D Mark IV comes with Dual Pixel AF which allows for continuous focusing in Live View mode at 4.3FPS. Tracking moving subjects is fast and accurate both in Live View and through the optical viewfinder. The 61-point AF system, with 49 cross-type points assures quick and accurate acquisition of focus in daylight as well as dark conditions.

The 5D Mark IV, similarly to other Canon DSLR, has several different ways to choose between focusing points. These are:

• Single-Point Spot AF – Lets you choose a single AF point which is particularly narrow.
• Single-Point AF – Lets you choose a single AF point which is less narrow than Spot AF.
• AF Point Expansion – You select a single AF point but additional four or eight surrounding points are utilized.
• Zone AF – Choose a zone of AF points. All available points are divided into 9 zones (groups).
• 61-Point Auto Selection AF – The camera automatically chooses which of the 61 available points it’s going to use, with no particular limit.

Canon EOS 5D Mark IV generally produces sharp and clear stills, comparable to those of rival cameras from Sony, Pentax and Nikon. While the Nikon D810 and Pentax K-1 produce photos with sharper details, this is in part due to 5D Mark IV having an AA filter which is responsible for some of the softness in details. On the other hand, the 5D Mark IV does show better color accuracy.

Conclusion

The EOS 5D Mark IV tries to do everything, and it in a very large part it succeeds. It is a DSLR designed to satisfy the best of professionals and to deliver in almost all types of photography. The Mark IV has a high-quality tiltable touch screen which comes very useful for easy access to settings and media, as well as a responsive touch-to-focus system. The optical viewfinder is very large with 0.71x magnification and 100% coverage, making it a reliable tool for snapping stills. While most DSLR users are primarily still shooters, many do want to have access to high-quality video production as well. Therefore, Canon has included both a headphone and microphone jack into the 5D Mark IV. Coupled with 4K resolution video at 30FPS, or 1080p video at 60 FPS and continuous AF in Live View video, makes it a capable video camera. The 61-point (49 cross type) AF system delivers fast and accurate focus with a variety of built-in point selection tools. Wi-Fi connectivity with Canon’s official App allows for fluid remote control. NFC and GPS are also built-into the camera. Still, not everything is perfect, and there are cases where the 5D Mark IV just doesn’t cut it. While it will do fine with 7FPS in burst mode in most situations, demanding sports photographers might fall a bit short with the IV. Image quality is another area where it might be slightly lagging behind competitor cameras in the class, but only when it comes to detail sharpness which can be easily correct in post-processing. Mark IV produces somewhat softer images due to the built-in AA filter, which is not present in say, Nikon D810. However, images from 5D Mark IV generally have better color accuracy and noise handling.

Unless you shoot a lot of sports or high-speed photography in demanding conditions, the Canon EOS 5D Mark IV will most likely be able to meet every challenge and emerge as an absolute winner. It has impressive performance, high-quality build, modern design and excellent image quality. While it is not perfect, we would say the 5D Mark IV is an excellent-value full-frame DSLRs which will satisfy almost every photographer in need of a serious DSLR for professional work, as well as any advanced enthusiast who is not on a tight budget.
Canon PowerShot G7 X Mark IIGo to Amazon
The high-end spectrum of the compact Point-and-Shoots has been very active in the recent years, with more consumer interest in this class of products than ever before. The PowerShot G7 X Mark II is Canon’s second attempt in the market of premium compacts, as the original G7 X left much to be desired. The G7 X Mark II features a 20MP 1-inch BSI CMOS sensor, which is a relatively big sensor for a compact camera. This sensor is coupled with a formidable 24 – 100mm F/1.8 – F/2.8 lens. This is the same sensor type and the same lens we have seen in the original G7 X. What is new, however, is the hardware where the upgrade was most needed – performance.  The G7 X Mark II features the new DIGIC 7 image processor which has proven very impressive regarding performance in many of Canon’s new cameras. The Mark II can now shoot up to 8FPS both in JPEG and RAW format. For the sake of comparison, its predecessor could only shoot RAW files at a burst rate of 1FPS.
Overall rating:
88
Design:
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Image Quality:
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79
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Portability:
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97
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Pros
  • Built-in WiFi
  • NFC Connectivity
  • Image Stabilization
  • Articulating Screen
  • 1080p Video Resolution
  • Touchscreen
  • RAW Shooting
  • Face Detection Focusing
Cons
  • No EVF
  • No Weather-sealing
  • No Panorama mode
  • Low battery life
Click to read the full Review
The body of the PowerShot G7 X II is made of metal with a soft matte finish, which gives off a feeling of durability and quality. Unlike its predecessor, the new G7 X has introduced a shallow rubberized grip for a more comfortable and secure shooting experience. Looking at the top plate one can immediately see that this camera is strong on manual controls. The top plate has two dials, where the bigger dial is the main shooting mode dial and the second, smaller dial is used for exposure compensation. There is also a built-in flash on the far-right side of the top plate.

The rear plate is largely populated by a 3-inch LCD touch-screen with a 1m dot density. The screen can be tilted downwards and upwards, making it easy to capture selfies or other shots from otherwise unformattable positions. The touch-screen is very responsive while navigating the menus is straightforward. Touch-to-focus functionality is also available working without a hassle.

Performance and Image quality

The 31-point AF system ensures quick and reliable focus in good lighting, although it does take a bit longer to acquire focus in dark conditions, with an occasional miss.

Image quality was already impressive with the first G7 X, in large part thanks to the larger 1-inch sensor. But Canon has been able to further improve on it thanks to the new image processor. With the Mark II, we are seeing more aggressive algorithms both for noise reduction and sharpening in JPEG files. This results in mostly noise-free images, even at high ISO such as ISO1600 and ISO3200, at some cost of detail preservation. Do note however that Canon gives you options to choose the level of sharpening the camera will do. Still, for any enthusiast photographer, we recommend shooting in Raw, as it gives you a lot of freedom in terms of details preservation and dynamic range compared to the JPEGs.

The G7 X Mark II can record FullHD 1080p videos at 60FPS, roughly the same quality as that of competitor cameras. In terms of connectivity, the G7 X Mark II has Wi-Fi (with a dedicated button for sharing), NFC and GPS. Battery life, though still pretty average, is significantly improved compared to its processor.

Conclusion

Canon has really upped their game in the premium compact market and G7 X II is surely putting up a good fight against competition. The Canon PowerShot G7 X Mark II is a very well-rounded camera, much more so than its predecessor. Its main rival, the Sony RX100 III has an advantage of having an electronic viewfinder but lacks a touch-screen. If you want a modern camera that can deliver high-quality images, offers plentiful manual controls, but saves you do hassle of changing lens, the PowerShot G7 X II might be the winner you are looking for.
Canon PowerShot SX720 HS: An Incredible Compact ChoiceGo to Amazon
At this point, we wanted to include a good travel camera with an affordable price. The PowerShot SX720 HS is a superzoom digital camera packed in a very compact design. It features a 40x optical zoom (24 – 960mm equivalent) and a 20MP 1/2 .3-inch BSI CMOS sensor which is pretty standard for a point-and-shoot camera. On top of the available 40x zoom there is also the Zoom Plus which is 80x digital zoom. If you need to get really up close there is still an extended digital zoom of 120x. While the sensor represents the standard affair of all mid-range cameras, the processor inside this camera is the real beast. The SX720 has DIGIC 6 image processor, the same one used in the semi-professional Canon EOS 80D DSLR.
Overall rating:
87
Design:
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100
Price:
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90
100
Image Quality:
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87
100
Portability:
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97
100
Pros
  • 30x Zoom Range
  • Built-in WiFi
  • Quick Focus
  • FullHD Recording
Cons
  • Not very sharp details at High ISO
Click to read the full Review
All of this is packed inside what is a very slim body when you consider the 40x zoom and will fit inside most jeans. Being a travel companion, Canon went for a modern design. Rounded corners and a smooth brushed metal finish give off a sense of style coming out of this camera. The front is decorated by a very useful rubberized grip which will certainly help with stability.

Controls are pretty straightforward and easy to get used to. There are just enough physical controls to satisfy those who would like a little more control but nothing too advanced to scare off those who value simplicity. The top plate hosts the shutter button, surrounded by a zoom rocker. There is also a dedicated video recording button and an On/Off switch. On the far-side of the top plate you will also find a built-in Flash.

The rear of the camera is populated by several useful buttons and a dedicated mode dial. The mode dial lets you choose between different shooting modes. Some are suited for advanced users: M (Manual), Tv (Shutter Priority), Av (Aperture Priority); Others let you retain some control while making the camera do most of the decision-making: P (Program), Auto, Hybrid Auto, SCN (Scenes), Live and Movie mode. Below the main dial, you will find dedicated buttons for Media, Info, Menu and Wi-Fi. There is also a four-way navigation controller which lets you control different imaging parameters such as Flash, Timer, Macro and Exposure. In the center of the four-way navigation there is a special Function button which lets you access common settings such as ISO and WB while you in the shooting mode.

Performance and Image quality

Images from Canon SX720 HS are generally nicely saturated and contrasted, which is appropriate for travel photos. Color reproduction is mostly accurate, with very good reproduction of challenging reds and blues. Images are also very sharp, leaving very little need for sharpening in post-processing. However, this sensor size does struggle with showing delicate details due to heavy noise-reduction. Beware of high ISOs if you are planning on printing your photos. ISO80 – ISO800 looks really good, with very little or no noise. Consequently, there is no detail smudging from aggressive noise-reduction algorithms. At ISO1600, if you zoom in to 100% you will see some noise and issues that follow, but otherwise ISO1600 is quite usable, even for prints not larger than A4. Going above to ISO3200 is not recommended if you want usable prints or quality digital photos, but will probably do fine for casual social media sharing.

Conclusion

The Canon PowerShot SX720 HS is an attractive, durable and versatile camera for travel photography due to its long focal range. It is also an excellent choice for an amateur all-around camera. With 40x optical zoom and a decent amount of manual controls, amateur enthusiasts can have a lot of fun with this camera. We would have loved to see Raw format support and more control over Autofocus functions, but we can forgive these omissions in a camera of this class. The SX720 HS does offer excellent image quality with beautifully rendered colors, and there is built-in Wi-Fi for easy sharing of these photos as well. The SX720 HS has recently seen a price drop and this is the perfect time to get it. This is because its successor, the SX730 is coming out next month. The new SX730 will offer very similar performance and features, with the only major upgrade being a tilt-able LCD screen. The choice is yours, but we think the PowerShot SX720 HS has the best value here.
Canon PowerShot D30: Your Underwater ChoiceGo to Amazon
With the summer coming up, this wouldn’t be much of a list if we didn’t add one of Canon’s rugged cameras which can shoot underwater. The Canon PowerShot D30 has a 12.1MP CMOS sensor with 5x optical zoom lens which amounts to 5 – 25mm (28 – 140mm equivalent on a 35mm camera) with an aperture of f/3.9 – f/4.8. It has built-in Flash and GPS and can dive underwater down to 25m (82ft) for 60 minutes. The D30 can record 1080p FullHD video at 30FPS and has optical image stabilization, dubbed ‘HS’ by Canon.

This model was announced in 2014, so it is roughly three years old now. Nevertheless, it is still the latest rugged camera from Canon and is still on-par with competitors. It even holds the original price tag, since there is no successor camera to force a discount. This speaks of confidence Canon has in this camera, but it is also true that rugged cameras, in general, don’t get updated that often and even when they do, upgrades tend to be minor.
Overall rating:
73
Design:
0
83
100
Price:
0
67
100
Image Quality:
0
50
100
Portability:
0
92
100
Pros
  • Waterproof to 25m
  • Shockproof to 2m
  • 5x Zoom Lens
  • Built-In GPS
  • Slow Motion Recording
Cons
  • No Built-In WiFi
  • Slow sensor
  • Images look somewhat noisy
Click to read the full Review
The body of D30 is all plastic with a few rubberized areas on front and back, either for better gripping or for protection against water. The original D10 was somewhat clunky in design, and which each model Canon has introduced a slightly more modernized, rounder design. The D30 is rounded on all corners and comes only in blue color. We like this new design and we think it is appropriate for an underwater camera.

Controls are easy to get used to and simple to use. On the top plate, we have a large shutter button surrounded by two smaller buttons for turning the camera On/Off and for video recording. The rear is populated with a range of Canon’s standard controls for compact cameras, and a 3-inch TFT screen with 461K dots.

Being an underwater camera this is the area where we get most obvious upgrades. The D20 was only able to dive in down to 10m of depth, same as the original D10. That’s why we were happy to see a nice bump down to 30m of maximum depth with the new PowerShot D30.

Performance and Image quality

The D30 is generally very responsive, with a relatively fast start-up. Navigating the menus, viewing photos and playback of video is all without lag. It can shoot up to 2FPS JPEGs which a nice speed for a camera in this class.

Unsurprisingly, the sensor is the same Back-Side-Illuminated CMOS with 12.1MP of effective resolution. However, Canon did update it’s in-body JPEG processing algorithms in order to improve sharpening and dynamic range. Images from the Canon PowerShot D30 are generally very sharp and colorful. Automatic White Balance does a decent job and comes with a special underwater WB preset (marked with a fish icon) which adds warmth to your underwater photos – which are otherwise too blue.

Optical Image Stabilization does wonders for photos in low light and D30 is no exception. This is especially important with the increased depth where there is less light underwater.

There are only three options for video, 640p and 1280p at 30FPS and Full HD 1080p at 24FPS. Video looks fine and is nicely stabilized thanks to the integrated IS. The camera will however record sound only in mono.

The Autofocus has also been updated and very well so we might say. The D30 will focus quickly and accurately no matter the conditions. It can struggle a bit in very dark lighting, but still, we are very impressed with AF performance which has proven better than rival cameras.

Unfortunately, there is no Wi-Fi, which is a real bummer, but we wouldn’t call it a deal breaker since we know compromises are bound to happen with rugged cameras. There is built-in GPS which used to geo-tag your photos so that when you later import them into apps like Google Maps, you get to see the location of where each photo was taken.

Conclusion

The Canon PowerShot D30 is a very durable underwater camera which is waterproof down to 30m and shock-proof up to 2m. It looks and feels nice, it is easy to use and makes decent stills and videos. The only real drawback is the lack of Wi-Fi connectivity, but there is built-in GPS which works perfectly. If you need a camera for a family vacation which can be used by non-tech-savvy members of the family, the PowerShot D30 is an excellent choice.
Canon EOS M50Go to Amazon
It’s true that Canon haven’t always been successful in selling their mirrorless cameras and making a noticeable dent in the market itself, but things are much different nowadays as they’ve managed to develop a very respectable line up of their EOS M mount bearing products and it holds true both for entry-level and the mid-range cameras (and will probably hold true when their mirrorless full frame camera finally hits the market and takes the fight to the other top-end devices).
Overall rating:
83
Design:
0
82
100
Price:
0
80
100
Image Quality:
0
78
100
Portability:
0
92
100
Pros
  • Very capable APS-C sensor
  • Great touchscreen and EVF combination
  • Good body design and build quality
  • Dual Pixel AF technology
  • Very respectable 143-point AF system
  • Customizable digital image stabilization
  • 4K and 1080p 60fps recording
  • External microphone port
  • Wi-Fi
  • Bluetooth
  • Great burst rate capabilities
  • Compatible with EF mount lenses via the official adapter
Cons
  • No weather sealing
  • Inferior battery life
  • No headphone jack
  • Only contrast-detect AF available during 4K recording
  • Heavy crop applied to 4K footage
  • No USB 3.0 support
Click to read the full Review
The Canon EOS M50 is the company’s newest entry-level offering but one that manages to bring a lot of features that wouldn’t feel out of place even on more expensive cameras. The first one is the sensor. It’s the same unit found in the 80D (One of Canon’s best APS-C DSLRs at the moment) and thus it’s capable of producing very pleasing photos in all lighting conditions (as it’s able to provide good noise performance and dynamic range). So, we’re basically having an entry-level camera with the image quality of a much more expensive product and that’s never a bad thing, don’t you think.

The M50 also retains the capability to pair nicely with Canon’s EF lenses with the use of an optional adapter and thus expanding your choice of lenses significantly. Then there’s the new Digic 8 processor, which among other performance-related improvements also aims to boost the JPEG image quality by bringing more mature processing algorithms to the table (which is a great thing to see, considering that many people using this camera will probably never dwell into the RAW format and would want to get great looking photos out of the box). The said processor’s main purpose though is to bring better overall performance, burst rate and video quality (since the video itself is a lot more demanding to process than the photos themselves). And noticeable improvements have been made in all of these areas; the EOS M50 is as responsive as the entry-level mirrorless camera can be, it is able to shoot at a very good burst rate of 10 fps (reduced to still very respectable value of 7.4 fps if you decide to use it by letting the camera focus continuously between each frame) and lastly, it makes the M50 the first Canon’s mirrorless camera to offer 4K recording (and the first mainstream offering in general, since the 5D Mark IV isn’t a camera that could fall into the category of affordable products). Still, it does so by applying an additional crop on top of one brought on by the APS-C sensor itself and is unable to make use of the Dual Pixel AF system (which works perfectly for 1080p resolutions and lower), but those aren’t such serious limitations for a budget-friendly camera such as the M50 and the benefits of 4K resolution alone will be enough for a lot of users wanting a simple way to get very good video quality without having to invest huge amounts of money.

The Canon EOS M50 also manages to implement great features like the 143-point AF system, fully articulated 3-inch touchscreen with a resolution of 1,040,000 dots, an electronic viewfinder with a full 100% coverage and a resolution of 2,360,000 dots, decent ISO range of 100-25600 and the fastest available shutter speed of 1/4000 sec, Wi-Fi and Bluetooth, built-in pop-up flash unit with a maximum range of 5 meters at the camera’s base ISO value and the top flash sync speed of 1/200 sec, enhanced digital IS that can also work in tandem of the one built inside your lens, a micro-HDMI and the microphone ports and lastly, a nicely designed and lightweight camera body that makes the M50 an immensely powerful, but still affordable and portable mirrorless camera.
Canon EOS 6D Mark IIGo to Amazon
Yes, we are aware that the Canon 6D Mark II has been the target of many criticisms both from the reviewers and users ever since it was released and some of those are certainly well-founded, but we are here to show the camera in a different light as it’s actually a very good DSLR when you look past behind some of its shortcomings (and considering the fact that it is a camera aimed at more mainstream audience, rather than hardcore professionals, it’s expected that it won’t perfectly fit everyone’s expectations).
Overall rating:
84
Design:
0
91
100
Price:
0
84
100
Image Quality:
0
82
100
Portability:
0
78
100
Pros
  • Good resolution and noise performance
  • Excellent AF system
  • Great battery life
  • Nicely designed body
  • Fully articulating high-resolution touchscreen
  • 6.5 fps burst rate
  • 1080p 60 fps recording
  • Dual Pixel AF
  • Wi-Fi
  • NFC
  • Bluetooth
  • GPS
  • Weather sealing
  • Microphone socket
  • Electronic image stabilization
Cons
  • Average dynamic range
  • No 4K recording
  • No headphone socket
  • 98% viewfinder accuracy
  • No built-in flash
  • No USB 3.0 support
Click to read the full Review
If there was one aspect of the 6D Mark II that has received the most flak, it has to be its sensor and the image quality its able to produce when compared to its predecessor and the rest of the competition. We are talking about a 26-megapixel full frame sensor, which was specifically designed to be used in this camera and cannot be found on any of Canon’s other cameras. Now, while it doesn’t bring any huge gains in image quality over the original 6D (say for the slightly improved noise performance and the increased resolution) in all truth, it’s a decently capable sensor and one that will provide many users with very good quality photos in most lighting conditions. While it won’t wow anyone with its dynamic range (which remains unchanged from its predecessor), it will still give you a decent amount of room when it comes to handling shadows and highlights and getting properly exposed photographs. You will also be getting a noticeably wider ISO range than the one that was previously available on the 6D and is able to shoot up to native values of 40,000 or expended ones of 102,400.

Now, while we may not have an image quality champion on our hands, the 6D Mark II does manage to do one thing right and that’s to provide excellent performance across the board. In a nutshell, you’ll be getting the Canon 80D in a full frame flavor; 45-point all cross-type phase detect system, Dual Pixel AF, 6.5 fps burst rate and an impressive endurance of 1200 shots per charge. None of these things would feel out of place even on a more enthusiast-oriented camera but Canon has still managed to include them on their mainstream full frame DSLR. While it doesn’t bring support for 4K recording (which is still a very rare feature to find on a Canon DSLR) and there’s no headphone jack to be found anywhere, the 6D Mark II does bring a good balance of video-oriented functions into the whole mix; 1080p 60 fps recording, built-in stereo microphones and the ability to connect an external one, digital image stabilization (courtesy of the Digic 7 processor), fully articulating 3-inch TFT LCD touchscreen with a resolution of 1,040,000 dots and lastly, the aforementioned Dual Pixel AF technology, meaning that it’s the best performing DSLR on the market (at its price point) when it comes to its focusing capabilities for video. It’s also very capable when it comes to focusing while taking stills (even for subject tracking purposes), but it's always a lot more magical to see a DSLR with an excellent AF performance while it's in live view mode.

The 6D Mark II is also well-equipped on the wireless front bringing a full and complete set of technologies: Wi-Fi, NFC, Bluetooth and GPS (very impressive indeed). So, if your line of work revolves around using any number of those on a regular basis, you’ll love this camera. Now, for the quick rundown of the rest of the features available on this camera: it has a fairly lightweight (for a DSLR) body with magnesium alloy construction and weather sealing, a 98% accurate optical pentaprism viewfinder with a magnification of 0.71x, a 1/4000 sec maximum shutter speed, a 1/180 sec flash sync speed (but no built-in flash unit), a single UHS-I compatible SD card slot and lastly, the standard orientation sensor.

While you couldn’t call the Canon EOS 6D Mark II an ultimate DSLR of any sort, we still believe that it manages to bring a nice balance between features and price and no matter how much you decide to criticize it for some of its shortcomings, the fact that it’s still a very capable DSLR remains.
Canon EOS M100Go to Amazon
While the Canon EOS M50 has already reached the market and attracted the attention of many different types of users, its cheaper alternative, the EOS M100, still remains as a great choice for those that are more interested in the stills side of things (rather than video recording) and don’t mind saving a few bucks to get very similar photo quality.
Overall rating:
89
Design:
0
89
100
Price:
0
97
100
Image Quality:
0
78
100
Portability:
0
92
100
Pros
  • Very capable APS-C sensor
  • Decent build quality
  • Very portable camera body
  • Unique touchscreen-oriented control experience
  • Excellent AF system
  • 1080p 60 fps recording
  • Dual Pixel AF
  • Wi-Fi
  • NFC
  • Bluetooth
  • Digital image stabilization
  • High-resolution screen with a 180-degree tilt capability
  • Affordable price point
Cons
  • No hotshoe mount
  • No headphone or microphone jacks
  • No viewfinder
  • No USB 3.0 support
  • No 4K recording
  • Unimpressive battery life
Click to read the full Review
For its price point, the M100 presents itself as a very capable mirrorless camera and really shows that Canon have finally found the right formula when it comes to creating fairly priced but feature-packed cameras that will be able to rival anything else no the market and showcase the company in an entirely new light (since they have received a lot of critique over the years for not investing enough of their time and resources in to creating truly modern products).

So, what makes the Canon EOS M100 such an interesting camera? Well, the first that comes to mind is its sensor. Once again, it’s the same venerable 24-megapixel APS-C sensor found in Canon’s ever-popular 80D model and one that brings the most improvement over the rest of APS-C sensors that the company has managed to incorporate in a number of their DSLRs and mirrorless cameras in the last decade or so. It has very good resolution and noise performance, as well as the excellent dynamic range that even manages to beat some of Canon’s more expensive cameras. On top of that, it also brings an ISO range of 100-25600 and is coupled with the powerful Digic 7 processor to enable some very good JPEG processing and respectable image quality even if you aren’t interested in harnessing the power of the RAW format. The Digic 7 processor itself also includes another welcome feature and that is the digital image stabilization (which still isn’t included on many of Canon’s DLSRs and mirrorless cameras during the time of us writing this article). While it won’t bring you as stable footage as a hardware solution would, couple it with a lens that already has built-in stabilization and you’ll certainly be getting shake-free videos most of the time.

On the topic of video recording, the Canon EOS M100 brings very solid 1080p 60 fps movie mode, the Dual Pixel AF technology (which not many companies have managed to compete with in terms of the focusing capabilities it brings to video recording), a tilting 3-inch touchscreen TFT LCD (which will be great for vlogging since it can be raised at an angle of up to 180 degrees) and a decent pair of stereo microphones (which certainly won’t do as good of a job as a quality external microphone would but will certainly do just fine for recording your voice in relatively noise-free environments). So, while it may not be a perfect camera for enthusiast videographers, it will be a very good choice for vloggers and more casual users. Now, there is one thing that makes the M100 stand out from the rest of line up and that’s the focus it has on controlling most of its aspect with the use of a touchscreen instead of relying on hardware buttons. While some may find such an approach slightly controversial considering the fact that many users swear by physical controls and built-in viewfinders, from our point of view such an approach makes perfect sense. The reason for that is that we are dealing with an entry-level camera that will attract the interest of many beginners and amateur photographers that are used to using a touchscreen as their only means of interacting with their shooting device (we are mostly talking about smartphones).

So, bringing those users a camera that they will instantly feel at home with control-wise is a perfectly reasonable strategy and it’s good to see that Canon is finding a way to cater to as many of different types of users as possible. The M100 also includes things like a built-in flash that’s capable of sync speeds of up to 1/200 sec, a 6.1 fps burst rate, an SD card slot compatible with the UHS-I standard, a micro-HDMI and USB ports, Wi-Fi 802.11b/g/n, NFC, Bluetooth and the obligatory ability to use Canon’s EF mount DSLR lenses with the addition of a compatible adapter (officially made by Canon themselves).

In the end, the Canon EOS M100 is a simple, easy to use, affordable, lightweight and portable mirrorless camera that manages to bring very beginner-friendly shooting experience but without any noticeable expense in terms of image quality (especially when it comes to its stills capabilities). There’s not much more we could ask from an entry-level camera.
Canon EOS 200DGo to Amazon
Considering how much Canon has invested in their lineup of mirrorless cameras over the years to present themselves as serious contender in that part of the marketplace some of us were quite surprised when the company have announced the successor to their smallest DLSR ever made, the 100D (which has been released a while back in 2013).
Overall rating:
84
Design:
0
84
100
Price:
0
88
100
Image Quality:
0
81
100
Portability:
0
84
100
Pros
  • Very capable APS-C sensor
  • Decent build quality
  • Very portable camera body
  • Dual Pixel AF
  • Wi-Fi
  • NFC
  • Bluetooth
  • High-resolution fully articulating touchscreen
  • Good battery life
  • External microphone jack
  • 1080p 60 fps recording
  • Very capable built-in flash unit
  • Affordable price point
Cons
  • Modest 9-point AF system and the 5 fps burst rate
  • Average viewfinder accuracy
  • No 4K recording
  • No headphone jack
  • No USB 3.0 support
  • No weather sealing
  • No stabilization of any kind
Click to read the full Review
The new model is called the Canon EOS 200D and marks their attempt to rejuvenate the public’s interest in DSLR cameras (which has seen a slow and constant decline from the moment the mirrorless cameras have become a mainstream thing) and doing so by offering an entry-level product that is priced aggressively and could peak the interest of many different types of users (no matter if they have never used a camera before in their life).

As is the case with many cameras in this article (especially the newer models) the 200D also uses the very familiar 24-megapixel APS-C sensor that was first lifted from the Canon 80D and thus, making the 200D itself quite a powerful little camera when it comes to its imaging capabilities. It’s always great to see any company expand its range of products by offering lower priced cameras that can easily be compared to more expensive ones image quality-wise. So, in a nutshell, no matter if you consider yourself to be a casual user or you want to explore photography in a more involved manner by experimenting with RAW format, you should never feel disappointed in any way by the output coming out of the Canon 200D.

Although the same rules apply here as with any other ILC (Interchangeable Lens Camera) as you will need a good quality lens to make the most out of that 24-megapixel sensor. Still, luckily for those of you on a very tight budget, Canon’s line up of EF-S lenses is excellent and many of those lenses are quite affordable for what they have to offer (especially the lenses such as the 10-18mm STM wide angle and the 55-250 STM telephoto zoom). Besides the very good Auto mode, you should expect a standard offering of exposure related parameters; 100-25600 ISO range, 30 to 1/4000 sec shutter speeds and the flash sync speeds that can go as high as 1/200 sec (the built-in flash itself is also very capable since it offers a maximum reach of almost 10 meters).

While the 200D isn’t a camera that would be remembered for its performance (because of its modest 9-point AF system and the 5-fps burst rate) it does incorporate one very important feature and that is the Dual Pixel AF system. This means that you’ll be able to get very good focusing performance while shooting using the camera’s screen and, in a way, even better performance than while using the viewfinder. That actually makes the 200D sound like an entry-level mirrorless camera, since most of them don’t offer a viewfinder (with the 200D does) and are centered around operating them by looking at the screen. This will certainly make more casual users happy, as most of them are surely accustomed to using a touchscreen for a lot of things and using one on a DSLR shouldn’t be any different (at least if you’re not using the Manual mode, but that’s also a non-issue here since Canon are professionals when it comes to creating a very functional user interface). The inclusion of the Dual Pixel AF system (and also the fully articulated 3-inch TFT LCD touchscreen with a resolution of 1,040,000 dots, 1080p 60 fps recording and also the microphone jack) also makes the Canon EOS 200D a very interesting camera for those videographers that don’t need 4K support but do want a light and easy to use camera that will give them good video quality and a nice feature set to support it.

So, while the camera body itself is one of the main selling points of the 200D, it does come with a few additional features worth mentioning that round up its entire image; a 95% accurate optical pentamirror viewfinder with a magnification of 0.87x, integrated stereo microphones, a mini-HDMI and mini-USB ports, a UHS-I compatible single SD card slot, Wi-Fi, NFC, Bluetooth and lastly, a large enough battery pack that gives it its respectable endurance of around 650 shots per charge.

In the end, for the price you’ll be paying for the Canon 200D (if you’re interested in this type of a camera) you’ll certainly be getting one nicely-rounded DSLR that won’t feel as cumbersome to carry around as many other ones on the market.

Selection Criteria

These are the criteria we take into review when recommending a camera.

Most important things we consider before recommending a camera

Design – Design is very important with any camera, as it affects both ease of use and handling of a camera. The visual appeal of a camera, especially in regard to camera type, is also something to consider.

Price/Product rate – Looking purely at specifications is not a good way to choose a camera. We have to consider the overall value of a camera, including its price and capabilities, but also it’s adaptability in terms of accessory availability and prices.

Weight – Some cameras have lots of features and versatility but are also heavy, increasing the burden of carrying a camera on a long trip but also adding to the challenge of prolonged shooting sessions. Other cameras are lighter than others by putting focus in compact and light design, without sacrificing crucial aspects of quality and performance. This is another factor we consider when reviewing a camera.

Waterproof capabilities – Rugged cameras are usually water and shock resistant out of the box, while most other cameras require special casing for additional protection. Though waterproofing is not a must for many photographers, it sure can in handy during rainy days. With underwater photography on the rise, we make sure to check and confirm any water-proofing capabilities of a camera in the review.

Grip – Grip and mean the difference between a sharp photo and a blurry photo. It can also mean the difference between a broken and a pristine camera. A bad, small grip which doesn’t allow the user to grab the camera firmly while operating it, can mean a lot of trouble.

Image Quality – Image quality is one of the most important aspects of any camera. Aperture and sensor size, quality of lens among other factors all greatly affect the final quality of your images. We take all these criteria into consideration before a suggesting a camera based on its image quality.

Adaptability – Almost every camera has potential features and capabilities expanded by accessories. Just how versatile these choices depend on how rich are the manufacturer’s offerings when it comes to accessories. For example, a certain camera may seem like a better deal with more features and better specifications for a lower price, but what you may not know is that the available lens collection could be limited and the overall choice may end up more expensive in the long run. This is why we make sure to note any noteworthy shortcomings (or advantages) when it comes available accessories and other purchasable equipment for your camera.

Ease of Use – Some cameras are easy to use by nature, while others require more advanced knowledge. But an advanced camera doesn’t necessarily need to have a steep learning curve, as it depends on how intuitive is design, control placement, interface, etc. This is something we watch out for when reviewing cameras, especially if we are talking about DSLRs.

Availability – We make sure to check and only recommend cameras that up to date in terms of availability. All listed cameras can be bought online through Amazon or eBay, while the shipping costs vary depending on the seller. These cameras can only be found in local shops be they official Canon resellers or a just a regular digital equipment shop.

FAQ

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the difference between full-frame and APS-C type sensor?

Full-frame sensors are larger than APS-C. The digital full-frame sensor is the equivalent of a 35mm film camera. APS-C sensor is mostly used for entry-level and mid-range DSLRs, while the full-frame sensors are used in high-end, professional cameras. Compared to full-frame, APS-Cs capture a smaller portion of the frame. That is to say, the edges are cropped to a certain degree. Full-frames also capture more fine details and generally produce higher quality images. Canon APS-C cameras have 1.6x crop factor, meaning that any lens you mount on a Canon APS-C camera will have a narrower field of view and a higher focal length equivalent compared to the same lens on a full-frame camera.


What is the main advantage of a DSLR camera compared to Point and Shoot cameras?

Aside for generally higher-end specifications which come with a DSLR camera, the main advantage would be the ability to use the interchangeable lens, which greatly improves camera’s versatility. Another major reason enthusiast and advanced photographers opt for a DSLR camera are it’s extended manual controls.

I would like high-quality cameras with fast performance, but don’t want the hassle of interchangeable lens and advanced manual controls. What would be a good choice?

Absolutely! This would fit into the high-end P&S class of cameras and we have just the camera for you! Take a look at the Canon PowerShot G7 X Mark II. You will get a relatively large sensor, very fast lens and great performance. This camera does come with significant customization and manual controls, but this is isn’t something you have to use if you don’t want to. It’s a great camera for both amateur photographers and a bit more enthusiastic crowd, as it will deliver great results either way.

If I want to do underwater photography, which camera would be a good choice and do I need special waterproof casing?

While there are many cameras which offer water-proofing via accessories, you should really be looking for a camera which is waterproof out-of-the-box. Canon has a line of cameras specifically designed for this purpose. From the PowerShot D series, we present you with Canon PowerShot D30 – the latest Canon rugged camera, albeit not so new anymore. You will get a decent 12MP camera, built-in Image Stabilization, Bluetooth for connectivity and fully-featured GPS integration. However, the best thing about this camera is, of course, its water-resistance, which is valid up to 30m underwater. You won’t find a consumer P&S camera that gives this deep anywhere else.

I want a camera that can zoom a lot without loss of image quality, what are my options among Canon cameras?

Basically, you have options. You either opt for a full-blown DSLR and a suitable telephoto-zoom lens or simply go for the Canon PowerShot DX720 HS. The DX720 HS is a hybrid compact camera with 40x optical zoom, with an additional 80x digital superzoom (which is again extendable to 120x).  This camera is a capable all-around shooter and it comes with Optical Image Stabilization.

I want an upgrade from a Point-and-Shoot camera to something more advanced, but I don’t really like the general bulkiness which comes with a DSLR. So, what is the alternative?

Canon’s ILC Mirrorless cameras are interesting choices for photographers who want a modern, advanced camera but still want to keep a light setup. Mirrorless cameras are lighter and smaller than DSLRs but produce similar quality and often better performance than their older brothers. Depending on your budget and needs, you should take a look at Canon M6 and Canon M10.

I am a professional and need a camera that can produce highly detailed photographs on large prints. Which camera should I choose?

With a 30MP full-frame sensor, the Canon EOS 5D Mark IV is your best choice. This camera is not cheap nor small, but it can handle (almost) every situation you throw at it. It has a highly durable, weather-resistant body. It also has a great AF system and a formidable range of custom controls for maximum shooting effectiveness. It is great for landscape and city photography, but it will do a good job in any situation except perhaps in demanding high-speed sports photography.

I’ve been using an entry-level DSLR for a while now and would like to move to the next step. As an enthusiast photographer, I don’t really the professional-grade cameras. Is there a good middle ground camera in the Canon line-up?

Canon EOS 80D is a straight-out best choice when it comes to Canon’s mid-range cameras. The latest iteration brings under the hood improvements which help position the 80D at the top of the list for advanced enthusiast photographers.  A very formidable camera which can adapt to wide range of scenarios.

What is the difference between DSLR and Mirrorless cameras?

Without going into many technical details, Mirrorless cameras, like their name suggest, lack the movable mirror which is used to transfer the image into the optical viewfinder which is used in DSLR cameras. Instead, Mirrorless cameras use the sensor to transfer the image electronically, into the EVF (Electronic Viewfinder). While Optical VFs are generally more reliable, EVFs have recently come really close to their older optical siblings. On the plus side, the Mirrorless cameras are generally smaller and lighter than DSLRs, and often provide faster performance. Mirrorless cameras are here to reduce the bulkiness of a DSLR while retaining most of its advantages. While this sounds great, one should note that high-end Mirrorless cameras are more expensive than their DSLR counterparts of the same class. The lens designed for Mirrorless cameras are also more compact than DSLR lens but are again more expensive as well.

Rating: 5.00 based on 1 Rating
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Anes Mulalic
I'm a copywriter, web designer and a passionate photographer. I can write research papers, blog articles, product reviews, buying guides and tutorials. I make them SEO-friendly, but also engaging and interesting.

I try to make the best of both worlds; I enjoy urban lifestyle, always meeting new people and networking, pursuing new knowledge and developing skills with ambition and dedication to building a successful, long-lasting freelancing career. At the same time I travel a lot, enjoying nature and practicing meditation.
Anes Mulalic

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