No purchases yet.
Your cart is empty 0 items $0.00 Go to Checkout 0 Login

Top 12 Medium Format Lenses in 2019 Market

Rating: 0 based on 0 Ratings
Igor Letilovic
  By Igor Letilovic
Top 12 Medium Format Lenses in 2019 Market www.sleeklens.com

After we’ve taken a look at some of the most capable medium format cameras that money can buy, it was only logical to inform you of some of the high-quality lenses that go well with these cameras. We’ve decided to pick three lenses for each of the four different camera systems we’ve covered before (Pentax 645, Fujifilm G as well as Hasselblad’s X and H mounts). This means that no matter what camera you’ve picked from our Top 5 Medium cameras article, you’ll be covered with a wide range of lenses for different types of uses. We hope that you’ll find this article to be informative and interesting to read, as well as to make it easier for you to get more feel for medium format cameras and the lenses that are available for them, since they often tend to be somewhat of a different story when compared to those lenses created for cameras with smaller sensors. We’ll try to make everything as clear as possible, so even those of you who are still new to these types of cameras can quickly learn their way around them and make the right purchasing decision by themselves.

Pentax 645 mount lenses

Pentax SMCP-FA 645 120mm f4 MacroGo to Amazon
If there’s one mount for medium format cameras that offers the largest selection of all when it comes to lenses it has to be the Pentax 645 mount, so it was really hard to sum it up to three of the best lenses. So, we’ve decided to pick those that will bring you most flexibility in terms of zoom range when you bring them together.
Overall rating:
65
Design:
0
80
100
Portability:
0
30
100
Price:
0
65
100
Features:
0
85
100
Pros
  • Sharpness, Incredible Bokeh Effects
Cons
  • Slow Focus
  • Heavy
Click to read the full Review
The first one on our list is the Pentax SMCP-FA 645 120mm f4 Macro lens. You wouldn’t expect for a prime lens to be as flexible as one with variable focal length, but you’ll be surprised how much types of photography can you cover with this one. First, it’s excellent for macro work (as it name implies). It can focus as close as 39 cm to your subject, giving you 1:1 real life magnification.

You can also use it as a portrait lens due to its short telephoto focal length (around 93mm in full frame terms) and decently fast aperture.

You can even use it for landscape work if you want to take a photo of a certain point of interest in your scene and emphasize it. Some of its more technical aspects include a construction made of 9 elements in 7 groups, a maximum aperture of f32, field of view of 32.5 degrees and a weight of 735 grams. If you’re a macro or portrait photographer, then you should definitely have a look at this lens.
Pentax-DA 645 28-45mm f4.5 ED AW SRGo to Amazon
Moving on from the only prime lens we’ve picked for the 645 system brings us to the first of the two zoom lenses, the Pentax-DA 645 28-45mm f4.5 ED AW SR wide angle lens. It will be an ideal choice for those photographers that need to fit a lot of information in the image frame, but don’t want to resort to using a fish-eye lens or creating a panorama.
Overall rating:
52
Design:
0
70
100
Portability:
0
41
100
Price:
0
30
100
Features:
0
67
100
Pros
  • Color rendering
  • Sharpness
  • 28mm wide
Cons
  • Price
  • Heavy
Click to read the full Review
It brings a 35mm equivalent focal length ranging from around 22 to 35mm, meaning that you can also use it as your general use lens when at 35mm, since that’s a widely excepted standard focal length. The constant maximum aperture of f4.5 and image stabilization (SR) will allow you to easily shoot in low light conditions without any need of a tripod and the weather-resistant construction means that this lens will be able to withstand almost any kind of harsh environments and never let you down in those critical moments.

The built-in DC autofocus motor will allow for quiet, accurate and fast focusing, while the 9 bladed aperture blades will give you smooth out of focus elements when the lens is stopped down. The lens itself is quite heavy for something with such a short zoom range (almost 1.5 kilograms), but this to its solid construction and the sophisticated lens design consisting of 17 elements in 12 groups.

While it may not replace a dedicated macro lens, it can focus as close as 0.4 meters, which will enable you to get some nice close-up shots of flowers and moderately big insects. Landscape photographers using one of the Pentax 645 cameras should look no further than this lens, it will surely satisfy the needs of each and one of them, be it with its build or image quality.
Pentax SMC-FA 645 80-160mm f4.5Go to Amazon
While it was very hard to pick the third lens on this list, we’ve eventually settled for the Pentax SMC-FA 645 80-160mm f4.5 standard zoom lens. If you already own a wide-angle lens like our second pick, the 28-45mm f4.5, then this one will be a perfect companion to that lens.
Overall rating:
55
Design:
0
80
100
Portability:
0
20
100
Price:
0
40
100
Features:
0
81
100
Pros
  • Versatile
  • Material Construction
  • Image Quality
  • Sharp
Cons
  • Price
  • Heavy
Click to read the full Review
It features a full frame equivalent focal length of 64-128mm, which is quite a nice zoom range that will let you shoot everything from regular types of photos while you’re out and about or portraiture where the decently wide aperture of f4.5 and the 128mm focal length will be very helpful. You won’t get as dramatic photos as with a prime lens, but those won’t be as flexible as the 80-160mm if you’re one of those people that doesn’t want to switch out their lenses all of the time.

The lens can be stopped down to as low as f32, while the angle of view you’ll be getting ranges from 47 to 24.5 degrees. Minimum focusing distance of 1 meter indicates that this is in no way a macro lens, but it will be sufficient enough for portraits or normal sized subjects, which is the type of photography that this lens is really intended for. At 1010 grams, it’s a very solid and well-built lens, but it also features quite a comprehensive optical formula consisting of 11 elements organized in 10 groups.

If you’re inclined to use ND or polarizing filters with this lens, then you’ll be happy to know that its filter size of 77mm will allow you to get a wide variety of decent quality filters for not much money. It’s only real flaw is that it lacks any kind of image stabilization, but thanks to its wide maximum aperture, it shouldn’t be too hard to get decent shutter speeds in low light conditions to be able to use it handheld and get clean and sharp pictures.

Fujifilm G mount lenses

Fujinon GF 110mm f2 R LM WRGo to Amazon
The item on our list of the lenses we’ve chosen for the Fuji’s G mount system is their 110mm f2 image stabilized Fujinon lens. As you can already tell judging by its type, this lens will perfectly showcase how capable the medium format sensors are in producing really stunning images with really thin depth of field.
Overall rating:
71
Design:
0
76
100
Portability:
0
85
100
Price:
0
50
100
Features:
0
72
100
Pros
  • Weather-sealed
  • Promising Bokeh Effects
  • Relatively Compact
Cons
  • Price
  • Not good for Landscape
Click to read the full Review
The maximum aperture of f2 will let a large amount of light to the sensor and the equivalent focal length of around 87mm will give you a nice distance to work with. No matter if you’re shooting portraits or just doing street photography, you’ll surely light the field of view you’ll be getting with this lens. Since there’s no image stabilization of any kind, this lens might not be ideal for video shooters, but it should do just fine for taking stills because of its very fast aperture.

The 9 rounded aperture blades will ensure you’ll be getting smooth looking bokeh even when the aperture is stopped down and the minimum focus distance of 0.9m will allow you to take close-up photos of subjects that are of normal size, but it certainly won’t be enough for any serious macro work. The Fujinon GF 110mm F2 R LM WR sports an optical design which consists of 14 elements in 9 groups and four of them are extra-low dispersion elements.

Full manual focusing is also available and so is the dust and weather resistance which will allow you to use this lens in all kinds of demanding conditions and environments. If you work is all about getting the nicest possible out of focus backgrounds or you need to emphasize your subjects, then this is the lens for you.
Fujinon GF 23mm f4 R LM WRGo to Amazon
Moving away from the long portrait lenses, brings us to the other end of the zoom range, so we’re dealing with an ultra-wide angle lens this time. It’s a Fujinon GF 23mm f4 R LM WR lens, which sounds like a perfect choice for any landscape photographer wanting to do take some photos with a very interesting perspective and a very big field of view.
Overall rating:
74
Design:
0
71
100
Portability:
0
87
100
Price:
0
61
100
Features:
0
76
100
Pros
  • Weather-sealed
  • Portable
  • Nano GI Coating
  • Sharp
Cons
  • Not good for Portraits
  • Price
Click to read the full Review
The equivalent focal length of around 18mm and the angle of view of 63.4 degrees certainly support that fact. Thanks to such a short focal length and a decently bright aperture of f4 means that you should have no problem using this lens for handled shooting, even in low light conditions. It’s not also not as cumbersome to handle as some of the medium format lenses thanks to its weight of 845 grams, which adds to realistic possibility of using it as your walkaround lens.

It does have one slight flaw and that’s its relatively modest close focus distance of 0.38 meters, which equals to quite a low magnification of 0.09x. While you’ll still be able to take decent photos of subjects that are easily visible to the eye, don’t expect you’ll be able to get any sort of dramatic close-up shots you would be getting with a dedicated macro lens. On the more positive side, the lens itself sports a very good build quality and a sophisticated weather resistance method which seals it at nine different spots.

The optical formula is also a very complicated one, having as much as 15 elements organized in 12 different groups. They also come with 2 aspherical, 3-extra low dispersion and 1 super ED element, to ensure the best image quality possible without any nasty optical problems like chromatic aberration or distortion.
Fujinon GF 32-64mm f4 R LM WRGo to Amazon
Lastly, after a portrait and a landscape-oriented lens, we needed to pick one that has flexibility as its strongest selling point, meaning that it could be used for all sorts of different applications. We’re talking about the Fujinon GF 32-64mm f4 R LM WR lens, the only zoom lens we’ve decided to choose for the G system of lenses.
Overall rating:
81
Design:
0
84
100
Portability:
0
86
100
Price:
0
71
100
Features:
0
83
100
Pros
  • Sturdy built
  • Weather and dust sealed
  • Sharp
  • Manual Focus
  • Quick Focus Motor
Cons
  • Price
  • Limited Zoom Range
Click to read the full Review
It brings a 35mm equivalent focal range of 25-51mm, meaning that it goes from fairly wide angle to a normal local length of 51mm, so you certainly aren’t getting a lot of reach at the telephoto end, but you are getting a wide variety of general focal lengths like 28, 35 and 50mm, which will be of use to many photographers out there, especially those who were planning to carry their camera on a vacation or use it for street shooting or even landscape-work.

Videographers will also appreciate the constant maximum aperture of f4, which means that they won’t have to deal with those annoying light changes when zooming in our out that can be observed with lenses that have variable maximum aperture. The lack of image stabilization is a shame, but since this is not a camera that was meant to be used for anything other than professional video work, we suspect that other methods of stabilization will make this slight omission unimportant. Thanks to it having an internal focusing motor, it should have no problems in giving you accurate, fast and silent AF performance.

The minimum focusing distance of 0.5 meters isn’t the best we’ve seen on this type of a lens, but it’s certainly decent enough to add to the overall flexibility, rather than taking away from it. Fuji also wanted to make sure that the image quality comes as close as possible to a prime lens, so they’ve opted in for a very sophisticated optical design consisting of 14 elements in 11 groups. 3 of those are aspheric elements and there are also one ED and one Super ED elements. The 32-64mm lens also doesn’t weight much (875 grams) when you consider its high built quality and excellent weather resistance which will enable you to use it in in both rainy, dusty and cold weather conditions (as low as -10 degrees).

Lastly, the filter thread of 77mm isn’t too large, meaning that getting a quality type of lens filter without spending too much money shouldn’t be an issue. All in all, if you need a lens that you could keep on your camera at all times and not worry that you’ll be missing a lot of shots with it, then the Fujinon 32-64mm f4 R LM WR certainly presents itself as very interesting purchase and you certainly couldn’t go wrong for choosing it to become a part of your camera gear.

Hasselblad X mount lenses

Hasselblad XCD 30mm f3.5Go to Amazon
It’s always exciting to take a look at a professional mirrorless camera, let alone one sporting a large medium format sensor such as the Hasselblad X1D-50c and that also holds true for those lenses compatible with the said camera system. In today’s modern times it’s all about miniaturization and making things smaller and more compact, so naturally the lenses themselves also got smaller because of the invention of mirrorless cameras.

The first lens we’re taking a look at is the Hasselblad XCD 30mm f3.5 wide-angle prime lens. It brings an equivalent focal length of 24mm in full frame terms, which is just wide enough to enable you to use it both for landscape photography, as well as taking any kind of photos when walking around with the camera.
Overall rating:
64
Design:
0
87
100
Portability:
0
75
100
Price:
0
30
100
Features:
0
64
100
Pros
  • Ideal for Architecture or Landscape Photography
  • Sharp
  • Fast Shutter Speed
Cons
  • Price
  • Not good for Portraits
Click to read the full Review
The lack of image stabilization is easily countered by the decently bright maximum aperture, which will allow you to get decent low light photos when shooting handheld and give you the ability to use lower ISO values. There’s also some possibility of getting interesting looking pictures with decently blurred out backgrounds, but only to a small degree due to the wide-angle nature of the lens itself. Its minimum focus distance of 40cm isn’t anything to write home about, but perfectly usable for a casual close-up shot or two. Another positive aspect of this lens is its low weight of 550 grams.

It will enable you to carry it with you at any time and never feel like its size is holding you back (at least when compared to other medium format cameras and their lenses). The lens itself also has an optical formula consisting of 11 elements arranged in 10 groups and a filter thread size of 77mm. So, if you’re looking for a lens that will give you a very flexible field of view, look no further than the Hasselblad XCD 30mm f3.5 lens.
Hasselblad XCD 90mm f3.2Go to Amazon
If you were looking to shoot portraits with your new X1D camera, then you are surely looking into getting a lens with a longer focal length and wide maximum aperture and this is where the Hasselblad XCD 90mm f3.2 lens comes into play.
Overall rating:
68
Design:
0
74
100
Portability:
0
40
100
Price:
0
80
100
Features:
0
76
100
Pros
  • Good telephoto lens
  • Sharp
  • Manual Focus
  • Image Quality
Cons
  • Price
  • Bulky
Click to read the full Review
It’s a very sturdy, but compact lens which offers a 35mm equivalent focal length of around 71mm, not ideal for taking headshots, but very convenient for something in between those and full-body shots. It’s also a focal length that’s decently convenient if you choose the XCD 90mm f3.2 as your walkaround lens, since it’s not nearly as tight of field of view as many other portrait lenses. Again, as is the case with many medium format lenses these days, this one also doesn’t include image stabilization, but since it’s so light weight and because it has a decently fast maximum aperture, you should have no problems in taking handheld pictures without the need of lugging around a heavy tripod with you all of the time.

The minimum focus distance of 0.7 meters will enable you to get decently close to your subjects, even if they aren’t large by any means, but still, it’s not a dedicated macro lens and you shouldn’t treat it as one. The optical formula that this lens carries consists of decent number of glass elements (10 in 8 groups) which means that all of the possible optical problems that could be found on a lens of this type will be kept well under control and the sharpness will be good even at the widest aperture of f3.2.

All in all, if you’re interested in getting a portrait-oriented lens that could also be used as a very decent walkaround lens, then you should really take a good look at the Hasselblad XCD 90mm f3.2.
Hasselblad XCD 120mm f3.5 Macro
To finish our short list consisting of the best lenses for the Hasselblad X mount, we’ve opted for one that will perfectly round up the trio of our best picks, the Hasselblad XCD 120mm f3.5 Macro lens. Despite being a dedicated macro lens as its name suggests, it’s also a very capable portrait lens, so in a way you’re getting two great lenses for the price of one.
Overall rating:
42
Design:
0
30
100
Portability:
0
40
100
Price:
0
20
100
Features:
0
78
100
Pros
  • Great Zoom
  • Image Quality
  • Sharp
  • Manual Control
Cons
  • Price
  • Heavy
  • Bulky
Click to read the full Review
It’s brings a focal length equivalent to a full frame 95mm lens, which is just about long enough for getting really up close to your subjects, no matter if you’re taking photos of people or small flowers and insects. Thanks to having a decently wide aperture of f3.5 it will enable you to really throw your backgrounds out of focus and put a lot of emphasis on whatever you’re shooting. It will also allow you to get decently fast shutter speeds for taking pictures without the use of a tripod, even in low light.

It would be nice if such a relatively long and heavy lens (970 grams) had optical image stabilization, but considering it will balance really well on a Hasselblad X1D-50c body, you shouldn’t have too much problems in using the entire setup handheld. Then there’s the minimum focusing distance, the most important aspect of a dedicated macro lens. The XCD 120mm f3.5 Macro doesn’t offer a 1:1 magnification ratio like some other lenses do, but most of them weren’t made to sit on top of such a high-resolution sensor and don’t allow so much freedom when it comes to cropping your images.

So, for most photographers it shouldn’t be an issue to shoot at its native close focus distance of 0.43 meters and crop in to the photo later in post-processing if they deem it necessary. Also, thanks to the sophisticated optical construction of 10 elements in 7 groups, optical problems such as the distortion, chromatic aberrations or color fringing should be kept to a minimum and really give the 50 megapixel medium format sensor the necessary room to shine. So, no matter if you’re looking for a dedicated portrait or a macro lens, the Hasselblad XCD 120mm f3.5 Macro will surely do the job in providing you with very professional looking images and you certainly couldn’t ask more from any lens.

Hasselblad H mount lenses

Hasselblad HCD 24mm f4.8Go to Amazon
We’ve saved the best for the last, as it’s time to reveal our top three picks for the venerable H mount of Hasselblad’s medium format cameras. Since it has the widest array of available lenses when compared to the other ones featured in this article, it wasn’t easy to choose only three lenses, but we’ve managed to find the perfect ones that should fit most types of photographers.

The first one we’re going to take a look at is the Hasselblad HCD 24mm f4.8 lens. It’s an ultra-wide angle prime lens that’s perfectly suited for those interested in landscape or architectural photography, since it offers a 35mm equivalent focal length of around 16mm and a wide field of view of 108 degrees.
Overall rating:
83
Design:
0
95
100
Portability:
0
87
100
Price:
0
71
100
Features:
0
79
100
Pros
  • Great Design
  • Ultra Wide Lens
  • Manual Filter
Cons
  • Price
Click to read the full Review
There’s no denying the fact that you can fit a lot of information in your frame with this lens. The maximum aperture of f4.8 means that you won’t be able to get most dramatic shots in terms of shallow depth of field, but it does let in enough light to allow for decent low light performance, both in terms of needed shutter speeds and focusing ability. You will also be able to get relatively close to normal-sized subjects thanks to the minimum focusing distance of 38cmm, which really adds to the flexibility of this lens.

The complex optical formula consisting of 14 glass elements organized in 11 groups will enable you to get high levels of sharpness without optical flaws such as chromatic aberrations or pronounced barrel distortion. Since ultra-wide-angle lenses are especially sensitive to the last two, it’s always a nice professional touch for a lens when it’s able to deal well with such problems.

So, if you own one of Hasselblad’s premium medium format cameras bearing the H mount and you are looking for high-quality wide-angle lens, there’s really no better option than the HCD 24mm f4.8 lens.
Hasselblad HC 100mm f2.2Go to Amazon
Now, after you’ve chosen the right wide-angle lens, which will cover all of your landscape and general photography needs, you’ll need to look into getting a longer lens that will give a bit more reach and allow you to have more control over depth of field. The Hasselblad HC 100mm f2.2 certainly presents itself as a perfect choice for that kind of use.
Overall rating:
68
Design:
0
71
100
Portability:
0
76
100
Price:
0
45
100
Features:
0
81
100
Pros
  • Wide Aperture
  • Sturdy
  • Fast Shutter Speed
Cons
  • Price
  • Soft Edges at Wide F-Stops
Click to read the full Review
The first reason for that is its 67.4mm equivalent focal length and the 37 degree field of view. While it’s wide enough to be used for applications other than portrait photography, it’s certainly best suited for those occasions when you have a subject in your frame that needs to be separated from the background and be in the center of attention.

The very wide aperture of f2.2 will certainly help you achieve the desired effect and give you those backgrounds that are nicely out of focus. It will also enable you to take photos in low light without having to use very high ISO values or achieve faster shutter speeds to capture action and moving subjects more easily. It does have one area in which it doesn’t excel as much and that’s macro photography.

The minimum focus distance of 0.9 meters will be fine for portraiture, but don’t expect to be able to take photos of very small subjects like flowers or insects. Moving on to other positive things, we have to mention the weight of lens. Thanks to the pretty straightforward, but effective optical formula of 6 elements in 5 groups, Hasselblad have managed to keep the lens relatively light, as it only weights 780 grams. It’s still a substantial lens, but very portable for a piece of gear that fits on a heavy medium format camera and keeping the overall weight down is never a bad thing.

So, if your photography is all about emphasizing certain parts of your images and keeping the eye of the observers on those areas, then look no further from the Hasselblad HC 100mm f2.2 lens.
Hasselblad HC 50-110mm f3.5–f4.5Go to Amazon
Now, for the last lens in this article and the last one for the Hasselblad H mount. After choosing two prime lenses, it was only natural that we find a capable zoom lens that will offer a lot of variety in terms of its zoom range, but also maximum aperture. So, after looking at a long list of different lenses available for the said mount, we have opted for the Hasselblad HC 50-110mm f3.5-f4.5 lens. It’s one of the most versatile lenses in this article and there’s certainly a lot of good reasons for that.
Overall rating:
55
Design:
0
89
100
Portability:
0
40
100
Price:
0
30
100
Features:
0
60
100
Pros
  • Wide angle
  • Telephoto capable
  • Sturdy
  • Sharp
Cons
  • Price
  • Bulky
  • Heavy
Click to read the full Review
The first one is its zoom range; it brings a 35mm equivalent focal length that ranges from 33.5 to 70.2mm. This means that you’ll be able to take a wide variety of different shots and that this lens can be used for many types of photography (such as nature, street, portraiture or even some light macro work). Decently fast maximum aperture of f3.5 to f4.5 will allow you to get fast shutter speeds, cleaner images in low light conditions and even throw your backgrounds out of focus to some degree (at least when shooting wide open at 110mm).

The close focusing distance of 0.7 meters isn’t the best you’ll find on any type of a lens, but pretty respectable for a normal zoom range lens like the HC 50-110mm f3.5-f4.5 and you’ll certainly be able to get close enough to take photos of flowers and even some types of insects that aren’t too diminutive in size. The only real flaw of this lens (if you are the type of person that likes to take their Hasselblad around with you very often or you like using it handheld) is its weight. At 1650 grams, this lens is a monster and you’ll definitely feel it on your camera while you have it in your hands.

But, since Hasselblad are all about making high-quality lenses, this certainly couldn’t be avoided since it has a very sophisticated optical design which consists of 14 elements in 9 groups and that fast maximum aperture also had to take its toll on the overall weight. Also, don’t forget the top-notch build quality, which holds true for all of the Hasselblad lenses we’ve picked for you.

So, if you’re one of those people who like to have one lens that will cover most of your needs or you wish to have a backup lens that you can decide to bring with you on those occasions where you’re limited in the amount of gear you can carry with you, the Hasselblad HC 50-110mm f3.5-f4.5 will be the perfect choice for you.

FAQs

I’ve finally decided to switch to medium format camera and have gotten myself a Pentax 645Z. Since I’m not a very heavy user, I only plan to get a couple lenses for it and switch them around when its necessary. Can you recommend me a few lenses that fit well together and can give me a nice amount of flexibility?

The first one we would recommend for you to check out is the Pentax SMCP-FA 645 120mm f4 Macro. If you want to explore the ability of a medium format sensor to get a thin depth of field, you’re interested in portraiture or you want to get some dramatic looking close-up photos, this lens presents itself as a perfect choice if you own a Pentax 645 or 645Z camera. The second piece of gear that should grab your attention certainly has to be the Pentax SMC-FA 645 28-45mm f4.5 ED AW SR wide-angle zoom lens. If you’re aching for a wider field of view and you’re seriously interested in landscape or architectural photography, than you should seriously consider this lens. Aside from its flexibility in terms of its zoom range, it also offers a useful constant aperture of f4.5 and a decent closest focusing distance of 0.4 meters. Lastly, the third lens of our choice is the Pentax SMC-FA 645 80-160mm f4.5. It’s the opposite lens to the last one, meaning it will get you a lot more reach at the longer end and also the same decently bright maximum aperture through its entire zoom range. It’s actually a perfect companion for the 28-45mm f4.5 and carrying those two lenses together with a dedicated macro lens such as the 120mm f4 will give you a lot of room to become involved in many different types of photography and without having to invest a lot of money in a much larger collection of lenses.

I’ve recently became a proud owner of a Fuji GFX 50S camera and I’m looking into acquiring some decent glass to make the best out my rather pricey purchase. Since I’ve never ever owned a medium format camera before, I’m a little new to all everything related to them, including the lenses. For starters, I’m trying to get a couple of lenses that will get me through a longer period of time, without having to invest in more, since a lot of my budget has already been spent on the camera itself. I appreciate all the help you can give.

Well, as is the case with other medium format systems in this article, we’ve also managed to pick three of the most useful lenses for the Fujifilm G mount. The first one that caught our eye and will certainly get your attention is the Fujinon GF 110mm f2 R LM WR lens and there are multiple reasons for that. You get very useful focal length for both general and portrait photography, a very bright f2 aperture to allow for great low light shots and background separation and a 9-bladed aperture mechanism that will give you nice and smooth bokeh even when the lens is stopped down. The second lens of our choice for the Fuji G system is the Fujinon GF 23 f4 R LM WR. It’s an ultra-wide-angle lens that will appeal to any photographer who wants to cram as much information in their frame as possible. It won’t give you such a dramatic field of view you like for example a fish-eye lens would, but you’ll still be able to capture a lot and without any obvious distortion. Lastly, we had to pick at least one zoom lens and we decided to pick the Fujinon GF 32-64mm f4 R LM WR as our first choice for the lens of that type. It offers a nicely balanced 35mm equivalent zoom range of 25-51mm, which is a perfect range for street photography, landscape work or anything in between.

The constant maximum aperture of f4 is also a nice touch to allow for good low light performance and some control over depth of field.

After a long time researching everything that has to do with the medium format cameras, I’ve decided to make a choice and purchase the Hasselblad X1D-50c mirrorless camera. I’m well aware of what it offers in terms of features and functionality, but I’m on the fence on what lenses should I purchase to use with it. Can you give me a hand and recommend a few, so I can get a better feel of what I can expect to get with the X1D-50c in terms of the overall flexibility of being able to change lenses?

Well, considering that most people like to shoot with wide-angle lenses, since they are best suited for general photography (both for indoors and outdoors), our first recommendation would go to the Hasselblad XCD 30mm f3.5. It will give you a very nice 35mm equivalent focal length of 24mm, nicely bright maximum aperture and a decent minimum focus distance of 40 cm and all of these things make for a very useful lens that you’ll be able to use on a lot of different occasions. Now, if you want something with a lot more reach, but equally good maximum aperture and close focusing capabilities, you should seriously consider the Hasselblad XCD 90mm f3.2 lens. This lens is perfect if you want to get into portrait photography or isolate your subjects, but you don’t want to sacrifice the flexibility of being able to use it for something like street photography or anything that requires a moderate amount of reach. If getting as much reach as possible is your top priority or you’re a dedicated macro photographer, then you should consider the last lens that deserved our recommendation, the Hasselblad XCD 120mm f3.5 Macro. Despite the fact that it sounds like a lens that can be used for only a few limited cases due to its long focal length, you’d be surprised how flexible it really is. It doesn’t matter if you’re a portrait photographer, a macro enthusiast or you just want a lens that will give you nice out of focus backgrounds, you really can’t go wrong with the XCD 120mm 3.5 Macro.

I’ve finally built up a budget to afford a Hasselblad camera and I’m planning to use it out and about a lot more than in a well control and closed environment. This also means that I’ll need a couple of decent lenses to carry around with me and to cover most of the possible use case scenarios I could encounter while shooting. Can you give me a few suggestions?

First, you should look into getting a decent wide-angle lens. There are many to choose from for the H mount, but the Hasselblad HCD 24 f4.8 is one of the best choices around. It will give you a 35mm equivalent focal length of around 16mm, which by itself falls into ultra-wide-angle territory. This means that you’ll be able to use that capable medium format sensor and get some stunning photos of landscapes in both good light and challenging conditions. The minimum focusing distance of 38mm will also help you get a unique perspective of your subjects when getting close to them. The second piece of quintessential gear that found its way on our list is the Hasselblad HC 100mm f2.2 prime lens. Judging sorely by its main specifications, you can easily conclude that this is a lens with some unique talents to its side. The 100mm focal length will allow you to get close to your subject and isolate almost any detail you wish and at the same time create a nice distinction between that subject and the background thanks to the very bright maximum aperture of f2.2. You’ll also be able to keep the ISO levels at low to moderate values when shooting in low light and also get decently fast shutter speeds. To keep things simple, if you want to take photos of subject that have to stand out from the crowd, this is the lens for you. Lastly, the trio of the most useful lenses couldn’t be complete without at least one zoom lens, so that’s where the Hasselblad HC 50-110mm f3.5-f4.5 comes into play. It’s one of the most versatile lenses available for the Hasselblad’s H system of cameras and there’s multiple reasons for that. The first one is its 35mm equivalent zoom range of around 33 to 70mm, which means that it falls perfectly in line with something you would call a standard zoom lens. While the maximum aperture is variable instead of being constant, you’ll still get a respectable amount of room when it comes to shooting in low light or blurring the backgrounds behind your subjects. You should also have no problems in getting adequate shutter speeds to be able to take handheld photos without risking too much blur due to handshake vibrations. Lastly, there’s the closest focusing distance of 0.7m, which is good enough to give you at least some macro capabilities while you’re looking for a smaller subject to take a photo of. If “flexibility” is a keyword you are looking for in a new lens, then the HC 50-110mm f3.5-4.5 is the perfect one for you.

Rating: 0 based on 0 Ratings
The following two tabs change content below.
Igor Letilovic

Igor Letilovic

An amateur photographer, songwriter, musician, computer and technology geek and an occasional comedian, I'm a little bit of everything. I always aim to pursue things I'm passonate about and try to look on the positive side of things whenever I can. My mission is to wrap my articles in that aura of positive energy and keep a healthy balance between being serious about my work and spicing things up with a little fun now and than. After all, life's a game and there's always a different way to play it.

Comments (0)

There are no comments yet.

Sign me up for a weekly summary of the best articles published on the blog

Your email is safe with us. Pinky swear