fbpx
No purchases yet.
Your cart is empty 0 items $0.00 Go to Checkout 0 Login

Author: Brian Price

Brian, formerly a member of the corporate world, is now a writer living in Europe, covering different topics regarding life, art and photography.

How to Work with Birth Announcement Templates in Adobe Photoshop

Welcome back to another Sleeklens tutorial. This time we’ll be talking about how to work with our templates for Adobe Photoshop, specifically our birth announcement templates. Follow along as we show how to utilize these great templates to creatively present the wonderful news. And for you photographers out there, These templates are great if a client has a request for a mass amount of birth announcements to be produced in a short amount of time. This is definitely an efficient way to get that done. Be sure to check out our video, which accompanies this tutorial.

Our birth announcement templates allow you to create a double-sided card. On the front, you can have a photograph of the newborn, as well as their name and other text. On the back, you can have a different image along with more text for additional information.

With our first photographs pulled up, let’s go ahead and jump right into it. We will start out by first going to the folder where our template files have been downloaded after purchase, and simply dragging the files for both the front and the back of the card over to Photoshop. Once the files have been dragged into Photoshop, the first thing that you will see are the first two layers which are basically the pattern guide and the instructions. You can make those two layers disappear by going over to the bottom of the right panel and clicking the eyes off, which are labeled “guide” and “instructions”. If you really want to, you can even delete those two layers all together, by simply putting them into the trash.

Once you have gotten rid of those two layers, the next thing that we’ll do is insert our picture that we have picked out for the front. With our photo already in Photoshop, we just need to open our files and choose the correct one. Since this template has effects that surround the image, the entire photograph will not fit. So, we will need to use the marquee tool to select the area of the photo that we want to show. Once we have our area selected, we will click Edit and Copy. Then, we’ll go back to our “birth announcement” front and simply paste the layer on which contains the photograph that we have just chosen. Keep in mind that if you are using a high resolution image, it will appear a lot bigger once pasted. So, we will use the move & transform tool to readjust our image to properly fit the card. With the tool selected, hold down the shift key to maintain the proportions of the photo and simply move the corners to appropriately readjust the size. Once we have the photo resized, next we’ll need to make sure that the photo layer is inside the Clipping Mask file. To do this, we’ll first go to the bottom of the panel and simply drag our photo layer into the clipping mask file, placing it directly above the clipping mask that we’re using, in the file.

Next, we are going to click Layer, scroll down to Create Clipping Mask, and your photo will automatically be cut and fit inside the circle of this clipping mask. If you find that the image still needs some adjustment, you can still do so before saving.

Once we have our image set in the template, the next thing that we’ll adjust is the text. When the template is downloaded after purchase, a document is included that will lead you to a site where you can download the fonts for use.

Moving along, we will go over to the panel and close the clipping mask, then we’ll open the text file. In our file, we’ll click on the one labeled “Arthur Johnson” and change it to a different name. Simply click on the where the name is on the template and type in the appropriate one for your card. On our card it says “We proudly welcome” just above the name. If you don’t want that for yours, you can easily change or delete it, the same way the we changed the name.

And that’s about it for the front of the card. Let’s move on the back, which will be a pretty similar process to how we did the front.

We’ll start out the same way by deleting the first two (guide & instruction) layers. Then, choosing a different photograph for the back, we will follow the same process used above of resizing and pasting the image onto the layer. Just remember, if your images are of high resolution, they appear a lot larger when pasted, needing some adjustment while holding the shift key to maintain the correct proportions. Once that photo is where we want it, we’ll drag this layer into the clipping mask folder,keeping just above clipping mask in the file, just as we did with the front of the card. Once that is done, we’ll click on Layer, Create Clipping Mask and like before, the image will automatically be cut for the clipping mask. Again, you can adjust more if needed before saving. Now that we have the photo placed in the back template, it is time to adjust the text for this side as well. The text can be adjusted the exact same way that we did with the front. Simply click on the portions of text that you want to change or get rid of and edit accordingly.

As you can see, with these templates, it is extremely easy to create your own cards (in this case birth announcement templates). Simply supply your own images and follow the process in Photoshop. Hopefully, this tutorial also demonstrates just how efficient of a tool this could be for a photographer as well.

I hope this was helpful. Also, stop by and check out our other templates for Adobe Photoshop as well. You may find more useful tools, suitable for your photography editing needs.

How to work with the “Starburst Overlays” in Adobe Photoshop

Welcome back to another one of our product tutorials.

In this segment, which goes along with our video, we are going to talk about how to use Sleeklens’ “Starburst” Photoshop overlays to enhance the effects of the sun’s rays in your photographs. Our Photoshop Overlays are a really great way to quickly add an extra bit of dramatic effect to your images.

With our “Starburst Overlays” loaded and our first photograph pulled up, we will go ahead and get right into it. For this image, we are going to be using Starburst-12. Simply open up your overlays and drag Starburst-12 over onto your image. Once you have the overlay on top of your photograph, you will be able to resize it to best fit your image. By grabbing and dragging the corners and side the starburst can be adjusted exactly the way you need it to be. Once the size is correct, then simply move it to where the effect would most naturally appear. In this case, we will place it over the sun which is peering over the landscape in our photo.

Once the overlay is sized and placed, the next thing that we will need to do is remove the black area surrounding the starburst. To do that, we’ll go over to the dropdown menu to the right that says Normal and make sure that the overlay is selected. Then, open the dropdown and click Screen which will remove the black around the effect. Now is a good time to move the effect to the right spot.

Now that have have our starburst in the image, it doesn’t look very realistic as the effect is white and doesn’t quite match tones of the sunset present in this particular photograph. So now, let’s go through how to add a more appropriate color to the overlay, one which better fits the scene in this photo. First, make sure that your overlay is selected in the panel to the right. Then, Go up and open the Layers tab at the top and scroll down to New Adjustment layer, then click on Hue/Saturation and the Properties box, containing controls and sliders for hue, saturation and lightness, will open up. We’ll click on the first button from the left, at the bottom of that box. This will ensure that the hue and saturation is applied to the overlay or the layer beneath it. Next, in the properties box, go ahead and put a check next to Colorize. For our photo, it has automatically selected a yellow tone, but we are going to adjust it to more of a yellow-orange and turn the saturation up to around 51. With those effects applied and adjusted, we’ll move the overlay just bit more to get it in the right place, and that’s it.

Now that we have applied the “Starburst” overlay and colored it, we’ve really added that extra dramatic element to this photograph.

Moving on to our next photograph, we have a nice street scene with the sun that appears to be setting behind the buildings. For this one we are going to apply a different starburst than we did with the first photo. To start, we’ll open up our overlays folder and drag Starburst-14 over to our image. Once we have the starburst in our image, let’s resize to fit and place it over the sun in our scene. Next, opening the dropdown labeled Normal, we will select Screen which will remove the black area around the effect. Then, we can adjust the placement a little more.

Now with our overlay layer selected, we’ll go up to the top and once again open up New Adjustment Layer, then Hue/Saturation. Once that properties box appears, remember to go to the bottom of that box and click on the first button from the left, allowing for your effects to be applied to your layer below. Check the box for Colorize. As you can see, you’ll be able to choose just about any color that you want for this, it just depends on the result that you’re personally going for. For the sake of keeping to a more natural look, we’re going to adjust the color to a yellow tone as to mimic the sun in the photo a bit.

That’s it for the second photograph. As you’ll see we have definitely added a bit more drama to the sun, giving even more life to this image.

And now on to our third image. In this scene we have the sun just peeking out from behind some buildings. This will be a good photo to use one of the colored starbursts that are included with this collection. Opening up our overlays folder, and then going into the folder containing the colored overlays, we’ll select Starburst-5-Colored. We’ll go ahead and drag our selection over to our photograph, resizing, rotating and then repositioning to the proper spot in the image. Once it where we want it, we’ll open the dropdown that says Normal and click Screen.And, that’s it for this one. The colored overlay that we picked was already a nice orange tone that goes well with the image, so we don’t need to go into further adjustments for that. If you feel that it may be a little too strong, you can simply go to the right panel and lower the opacity of that layer to how you want it.

All three edits were quick and really simple to apply. Although these are easy adjustments, the end result bring a lot more life and color to the photograph. Hopefully you will get your hands on some of these overlays and put your own creativity to work.

Thanks for following along. Until next time, keep putting your creativity to the test!

How to Work with Through the Woods – High Dynamic Range tools

Hello everybody. In today’s tutorial about working with our “Through the Woods” Lightroom workflow for landscape photography, we will take a closer look at high dynamic range improvement. More specifically we’ll go into how to improve the range between the lights and darks in your photograph.

We will get started with our first photograph if the sun setting over an area of wetlands. To begin this one, we will go into our “Through the Woods” presets and apply Base – High Dynamic Range. Once applied, this preset has greatly improved the overall photograph instantly. Before we started this photo was very underexposed, but now the details, shadows and color have been brought out quite a bit. Although it brought a lot back to this photo, this HDR preset needs to be tweaked a little, for this image, to make the clarity, sharpness and color look like it is overdone. To do this, we make a few adjustment in the tool panel to the right. When we applied the preset, the highlights were set all the way down and the shadows all the way up. We’ll just adjust those slightly. Then, we are going to move the Saturation and Black sliders down, just a bit, and the Whites slider up. Next we’ll go into the Detail panel and lower the Amount under Sharpening, just to make it a little more realistic. This is all about finding the balance. Sometimes when we apply HDR effect to a photograph the outcome can be a bit unrealistic, so finding the balance would be keeping the desired HDR effect while maintaining the realistic appearance of the scene, unless unrealistic is what you’re going for. That we’ll save for another day. To further tweak this preset, we’ll also adjust the colors a little. So going into the Color tab, we’ll slightly turn down the yellow and orange, then turn up the blue and green, just a bit.

In the final image we can see that, with only applying one preset and adjusting it, there is a huge difference between the before and after. We have brought a lot of that lost detail back, as well as the color and definition in the sunset and clouds. After you’re done here, come and learn more about bringing back color and light with “Through The Woods”.

Now we will move on to our next photograph which is some area that appears to be at the base of a mountain. For this photo, we’re going to start it off by applying the Base – Punchy preset. Although this isn’t an HDR preset, it does give us many of the same effects such as improved that range between lights and darks, as well as the color and details. We will also be applying a Tone preset, so scrolling down, we’ll select Tone/Tint – Warm it Up. To improve the clarity we will also apply the Polish – Add Clarity preset, then for the color we will apply Tone/Tint – Color Pop. Once we’ve applied those, we will go over the our panel and make a few adjustment to tweak these presets a little. First we’ll turn down the Clarity, then open the Detail tab and turn down the Amount under Sharpening.

That was a really quick edit. In the end result we can see that this photograph now has a much warmer tone. A lot of the detail has been returned to this photo as well, especially in the water and the grass. All of this was done with just a few presets, stacked on top of each other and adjusted a little.

Side note: If you are into landscape photography this is definitely a great tool to have, especially when you want to make edits quickly.

On to our third and final photograph, looking out through the trees over a mountain range. We will start this one with the Base – Morning Light preset, which has an effect similar to HDR, but a little more subtle. For a bit more of the HDR effect We’ll also apply the Base – High Dynamic Range preset. Once this has been applied, it seems to have blown out the color quite a bit, appearing unrealistic. To correct this by applying the Tone/Tint – Desaturate preset, which will take away some of that excess color. We will go back over to to panel and make a few more adjustments. We’ll start in the Detail tab by turning the Sharpening amount dTown, then going into the Basic tab, we will turn up the Highlights up and the Shadows down, both just a tiny bit. Finally, we will go into the Color tab and turn both the Green and the Yellow up a little.

That edit was a quick one as well. Starting out with photo that is backlit by the sun, losing a lot of the detail in the shadows and darker areas. By applying and adjusting only three presets, we were able to bring back all of that detail and color, really enhancing the through the woods photograph quite a bit.

How to work with the “A La Carta Food Workflow” in Adobe Lightroom

In addition to our video of the same title, this tutorial will get into the general use of our “A La Carta” workflow for Adobe Lightroom. This workflow has been designed by Sleeklens to specifically support the Post-production editing and enhancement of food photography, containing 21 brushes and 82 presets.

With our photograph of a nicely plated dish pulled up, let’s go ahead begin.

For this photo, we are going to start out with the “A La Carta” presets. And, for the first one we will use All in One – Sweet Paprika which will add a bit of contrast and also warm up the image. Although this preset did warm up the photograph, the effect was a little too warm. To adjust that, we will apply another preset. For this we will use the Color Correct – Reduce Oranges, which will, like the name suggests, reduce the orange tones in your image. The fact that these presets are stackable is great, this way we can apply presets, one on top of another, to get the look and effect that we want. And, even though these presets are considered “one click edits”, they can be easily adjusted to work best for the particular image that you are editing.We are going to tweak the presets that we have just applied, over in the Basic panel. For this image, we’ll move the Black slider up to about +30 so it isn’t as dark.

Now that we have applied a couple of presets and adjusted the appropriately, we will now move over to the “A La Carta” brushes. To start off, the first brush that we will use is the Enhance – Color/contrast brush. We’ll run this brush generally over the food on the plate. This will enhance the details and contrast of the areas where it is applied.

To switch to another brush, click New to start a fresh one.

Let’s go back into our brushes and scroll down to the Light – Brighten brush. We’ll just apply this brush to the food as well, just to add a little more light. We are brightening up the food a bit to bring more attention to it, as the food is the main subject in this photograph. When we finish with that brush, go ahead and click New to start a fresh brush.

Now we will go back into our brushes, this time going with Color – Red. Before applying this brush we are going to make it a little smaller, which you can do in the panel or with the bracket ([]) keys on your keyboard. We’ll run this brush over the tomatoes and red pepper on the dish, to bring some more of that color out. If you find that the color of the brush is too bright, you can make adjustments to the sliders for the brush, located in the panel to the right. For this one, we will turn down the saturation a bit.

Next, we are going to use another Light brush, this time we will go with Light – Reduce Highlights. I am just using this brush in the areas that appear to be a little blown out and way too bright.

Now let’s go back over the our presets and add a vignette to our photo. Scrolling down through the presets, we’ll select the Subtle White vignette, which will add a soft white glow to the outer edges of this image.

Now that we have finished with this photograph, we can see obvious difference in the before and after. We have focused more light on the dish and brightened up the colors of the food. Also, the subtle white vignette draws more focus to the center of the photo, where the food is.

Let’s move on to our next image, which is a nicely plated dessert. We will start this one off by applying the All in One – Fresh Contrast preset, which is going to add color, light and contrast all in one click. We will follow that up with the Base – Clean and Clear preset. Next, we want to add some more light, so we’ll apply Exposure – Brighten Shadows. Once applied, I’ll go over to the panel and raise the Shadows slider, just a bit, to bring up the shadow a little more.

Now it’s time to move over to our brushes. For the first brush, we will use Enhance – Clarity and Detail. We are going to run this brush just over the food, enhancing the texture and making it look more appetizing. After that we will go back over to our presets and add a vignette, and for this one we are going to use the Subtle Black vignette. As mentioned before, as the presets are one click edits, but they can be adjusted and tweaked. I will go over to the color panel and increase the orange to add just a bit more color to this dessert.

In the before and after views of the photo, the differences are pretty noticeable. We have, again, brought more light, contrast and color to the image, as well as brought more focus to the subject with a vignette. The end result is a much more appealing and appetizing food photograph, all done quickly.

For our third photograph, we have one that appears to be a little underexposed and lacking in some of the detail on one side. Let’s see what we can do with it and apply the All in One – Fresh Contrast, like we used in the previous photo. Once applied, we can see a return of that missing color and contrast. Next, we’ll apply the Base – Clean and Clear preset.

Now we’ll go over to our “A La Carta” brushes and scroll down to the Light – Brighten Shadows brush. Making this brush bigger, we’ll use it in the areas where the shadows are a bit overwhelming and have covered up a lot of the detail. Then, after clicking New, move on to the Enhance – Clarity and Detail brush. Like the previous photo, we will apply this brush to the food in order to bring out some more of the detail. An extra bonus to this brush, is that it also brings out the highlights, so it adds some more light as well. For the last thing that we’ll do is add a vignette. So, let’s go back over to the presets and select Vignette – Subtle Black, which will go well with the darker tones in the photograph. It doesn’t make a huge difference, but it does darken the edges, drawing more focus to the food in the center.

In our final image we were able to keep the same darker tone. However, we have made a very noticeable difference by enhancing the the color and light, while maintaining the darker contrasts in the outer areas in the photograph, bringing more attention to the subject. As you can see, this workflow works wonders with enhancing food related photographs with edits that can be done quickly and easily in Adobe Lightroom.

Thanks for following along with us, and be sure to check out some of the other great posts on the Sleeklens blog, updated constantly with fresh material by some great artists. Find new topics regarding Lightroom, Photoshop and general photography.

How to work with the “Light Flares Overlays” in Adobe Photoshop

Welcome back, In our tutorial for today, we will be going over the basics of how to use our “Light Flares Overlay” for Adobe Photoshop. Traditional light flares are the effect that you would get if you shooting directly towards the sun, without the ability to really control how it affects your image. However, now with Photoshop, these overlays allow the ability to add that effect exactly how you want it to look. The “Light Flares” collection contains 11 white light flares and 14 color light flares, which are quick and easy to add, even when applying more advanced effects, to your photograph.

Let’s go ahead and get started with our first photograph, which is an overhead view of the sun setting over top of a forest.

The quickest way to get the light flares into you photograph is to open up the folder where you have them stored and simply drag them over. For our first photograph we are going to use Flare–4. With it selected, simply drag it on top of your photograph. Once there, you will want to resize it by grabbing the corners and dragging them in or out. While adjusting the size, you can hold the Shift key to keep it locked to proportion to how it originally was. Once the sizing is right, then you move the effect to the area where the sun is in your photo. After you place it, you can still move it for correction if needed. Once you have it where you want, go ahead and hit the return key.

Next, we’ll need to get rid of the surrounding black area and apply the flare to your image. To do this we will select the flare in the panel, then go up and open where it says Normal. In the list that appears, we are going to click on Screen, which will show the flare where you placed it, without the black background that it had before. As mentioned before, we can adjust the location of the flare if it doesn’t quite look right where you initially placed it. For this photo we are going to use the transform controls to move ours just a little to better fit this image. For our flare, we will also need to change the color to more appropriately match the scene. We will go for a yellow tone for this particular flare. To do this, make sure that you have Flare selected in the panel again, then go up to the Layers tab and scroll down to New Adjustment Layer and click on Hue/Saturation. This will open up a dialog box in the upper right. In the box, we will click on the first icon from the left, on the bottom. This will ensure that the hue and saturation will be applied to the layer below it. Next we will click Colorize, which will allow us to change the color of our flare. We’re going to move the Hue slider to more of a yellow tone. Below the Hue is the Saturation slider, which we will move just a bit to enhance the color some more. And, that’s it. These overlays make it easy to enhance your photographs with more dramatic lighting effects. In our end result, we have added a bright light flare that looks like your were shooting right into the sun’s path.

Now, let’s move on to our second photograph, which is of a low sun over some open farmland. Like before, we will open the folder where our overlays are stored, this time dragging Flare–3 over to our photograph. Again, the flare will need to be resized to appropriately fit this image. Once the flare is sized and placed about where we want it, we’ll hit the enter key. Just like we did with the previous photo, we are going to click on Normal and open up that menu, but this time, instead of choosing Screen, we will select Color Dodge. Once selected, it will get rid of that black background surrounding the flare, however it has made a very bright circle that is way too bright for this image. To fix that we will select our our Flare–3 in the panel, then go up and open the New Adjustment Layer, just like before, selecting Hue/Saturation. Once the dialog box appears, make sure to click the icon on the bottom, fourth from the left to ensure that your settings apply. Then, we are going to move the Hue slider more toward the orange tones, which is more appropriate for this scene. We’ll also turn up the Saturation slider quite a bit. After that, we will move the flare a little higher upto more of a natural location.

Since we used the Color Dodge, our flare appears to be a little blown out. To correct this, we can go over to the panel and click on Flare-3, near the bottom, and use the Opacity slider to adjust how much the flare shows up in the photo. For our image, we will lower the opacity some, then go back into the Hue/Saturation, turning the Saturation up and the Lightness down. Another quick application, adding more a bit more life to the photograph.

As we mentioned, this overlay collection includes 14 color flares, so we’ll show you one of those now. Opening up the folder we have our flares stored, we’ll go into the colored folder and select Flare-9 and drag it over to our image. This gives us a nice reddish orange flare that goes well with the sunset in our scene. Again, we’ll resize the flare and get it situated about where we want it, then we will go over to our menu, click on Normal and select Linear Dodge from the drop down and adjust the opacity a bit, until it looks right.

As we have just shown, these “Light Flare Overlays” are a great, easy way to add some dramatic lighting effects, enhancing the scene a bit in your photographs.

Thanks for following along, and remember to check back with us often for more Lightroom and Photoshop tutorials.

How to Work with Through the Woods – Bringing Back Color and Light

Welcome back! Today we are going to be talking about how to use our “Through the woods” workflow for Lightroom, designed primarily for editing landscape photography. More specifically, we will be focusing on how to use this workflow to bring color and light back to your landscape photographs, especially with photos where the sun or backlighting may have washed out some of the color and detail. This tutorial goes along with a great video which you can find on our YouTube channel.

Let’s get right into it. With our “Through the Woods” workflow and first photograph pulled up in Lightroom, we are going to start out by applying the All in One – Shine into the Sunset preset. Once applied, if you watch the video, you’ll see that this one preset has already brought a lot of detail and light back into this photo, as well as enhanced the dynamic range.

Another way to fix underexposed images with this workflow are the Exposure presets. For this image we are going to select Exposure – Brighten Shadows. What this did was brought more light out in the darker areas in the photograph. Then we are going to apply one of the Base presets, for this we’ll go with Base – Basic Film.

Next we are going to move over to the brushes and show how they can be used to bring some more color and light to this image. Once we have them opened up, scroll down to the “Through the Woods” brushes. The first brush that we are going to use will be Light – Add Golden Sun. We will run this brush over the sun that is peeking over the horizon, as well as the areas in the water where the sun is being reflected. Just like the name, this brush adds the nice hazy yellow tone that you would get from golden sunlight.

Note: Remember to click New before selecting a different brush. This will reset it to a fresh one.

Now let’s go back to our “Through the Woods” brushes and this time we will use the Haze – Cyan brush. For this brush, we are going to turn up the Saturation a bit, then run this brush around areas in the sky to return some more of the blue tones. We’ll also run this brush around some of the areas in the water where we can see reflections from the sky.

Now we will go back into our brush collection and select one of the Basic brushes, this time we are going to choose Basic – Contrast and Clarity. We are going to apply this brush to areas in this photo where there are groups of rocks and land sticking out from the water. We’ll use this brush to bring out more of the detail from those areas. Before we finish with this photo, we will open the Basic tab and adjust some of the sliders to tweak the image a bit more. I will turn both the Saturation and Shadows up just a little, returning just a bit more of that detail.

Our end result a photograph that shows more of the details that were hidden away in the darkness. We have brought out more light which has really improved the entire scene captured in this photo.

Let’s move right along to the second image that we have to edit today, which is a subtle ground up shot of a sparse forest. We begin this one by applying the Base – Auto Tone (Color) preset. This will get us started by adding a little more light and color. Next we will use an Exposure preset to lighten the shadows a little, that are hiding some of the details. For this we will select Exposure – Brighten Shadows. This preset really brought a lot of the detail back to the large tree in the foreground of this photograph, which was lost before.

Now, concentrating on the greens for this photo, we are going to reduce the yellows a bit. We will do this by applying the Color Correct – Reduce Yellow preset. Then going over to the Color tab, we will go into Saturation and turn up the Green some more.

Going back over to our “Through the Woods” presets, we are going to apply the Polish – Add Clarity. This really helps reveal more of the details, especially the bark on the trees, which definitely adds much more character.

Now it’s time to move over to our “Through the Woods” brushes. The first brush that we will use on this photo will be Light – Add Golden Sun. We are going to apply this brush to the area at the top, where the sun is shining through the trees. We’ll also run this brush over the areas that the sun is reflecting off of like the tree trunk in the foreground. To finish this photo we will go into the Basic tab and tweak the presets just a little more by turning up the Contrast and the Shadows.

The final result shows that the changes we made were subtle, however we did bring a lot of that lost light and detail back into this photograph, especially the details in the tree standing in the foreground.

For our third photograph, we have a view looking out over some hills. Let’s use a Base preset to get this one started, We’ll use Base – Dance in the Rain. This preset will add some light back to the photo and will bring up the shadow a bit. We will follow that up by applying an Exposure preset to bring in just a little more light, for this we’ll use Exposure – Brighten.

Now scrolling down to our Tone/Tint presets, we are going to apply Tone/Tint – Warm it Up, which will give this photo a much warmer color tone. Now we’ll move over to the brushes and use the Light – Add Golden Sun brush again. This brush is really useful for photographs that have a lot of sun in them. It works great to spread the warm light throughout the affected areas, really warming up the image. We will run this brush directly over the sun in the photo, as well as the areas where the beams appear to travel and reflect.

Now we will click New to start a fresh brush, then go back into the “Through the Woods” brushes to select another. Scrolling down to the Color brushes, we are going to select Color – High Saturation. We’ll run this brush over the dirt trail and green shrubbery in the foreground, adding a little more color to those areas.

Closing the brushes, we will go back into our Basic tab and turn the Shadows and Contrast up just a bit, then we’ll turn the exposure down just slightly.

In our end result we have only applied a few changes, but made huge difference in this photograph. We have added a lot of light, as well as color, allowing more detail to show through. The original image was backlit by the sun which was drowning out the detail and color in the foreground of the photo. With workflows like “Through the Woods”, you’ll have the ability to correct and enhance colors, lighting effects, details and so much more, restoring the scene to the way you saw it through your own eyes or better.

Thanks for following along and be sure to check out the video which goes with this Through the Woods tutorial.

How to Work with A Winter’s Tale – Adding Color and Tone to Winter Photographs

We return with another tutorial about working with our “A Winter’s Tale Workflow”. This time we will get into how to use the presets that are included with this workflow to add color and tone to your winter photographs. A really great thing about winter photographs is that when you are taking them in the snow, it gives you a big white canvas which will make your colors in the image really pop. Depending on what you envision as your final result, you may want to either make the colors stand out or mute them a bit. Often times in the winter, even if it isn’t snowing, the scenes will normally be lacking in foliage giving a muted tone to the environment. We will touch on most of this while we work with this workflow, so let’s get right into it.

We will begin with our first photograph by starting out with the All in One – Warm & Cool preset. Now that we have applied this preset, We are going to tweak it a bit. Although all of the preset are “one click edits”, they can be completely adjusted to fit the needs of your specific job. So, let’s go into the Color tab and make the subject’s red sweater stand out more by turning up the Red under Saturation. We will also do the same with the Green and Aqua to make those colors stand out a little more as well.

A lot of times you may find that when you have a winter photograph with snow in the scene, you may need to turn the highlights down to keep them from being blown out, even if it seems that your subject is properly exposed.

That is it for the first photo. We didn’t really do to much, however the changes are noticeable. Although we did make some adjustments, we have only applied one preset and tweaked the color and highlights.

Let’s move on to our next photograph. One advantage to editing photographs where there is a wide open, snowy environment is that it allows you to really use tone however you want. For this photo we are going to add a purple tone, so for that we’ll use the All in One – Lilac preset. Once applied, it has made the photograph very purple. Since it is a little more purple than I want it to be, we will go over and open up the Basic tab and make a few adjustments. We’ll start by turning the Temperature up some so the lilac color isn’t as cool. Then, we will also turn the Tint down just a little. And also, we will turn up the Contrast a bit.

Finally, we will go back over to our presets and scroll down to the “A Winter’s Tale” vignette presets, selecting Vignette – Black. And that’s it for our second photograph. Another quick edit that significantly changed the image. We have applied a purplish tone and a vignette which really changed the overall feel of the image. This edit wasn’t really meant as an enhancement, but rather just meant to alter the feel by changing the color tone a bit.

Now we will move along to the third photograph that we are going to edit. One great thing about Lightroom is that, when you have your navigator open, you can scroll over the presets in your list and it will show a preview of what each preset will look like while the cursor is over it. That definitely takes a lot of the guessing out of it.

Let’s go ahead and start this photo out with the All in One – Maple Syrup preset, which will add a yellow tone and increase the contrast some. For this photo, I feel that the Contrast is a little too high so we will turn it back down a little. We’re going to turn the Highlights and Shadows down just a little bit as well. To tweak this preset some more, let’s open up our Color tab and turn down the Blue and the Yellow just a bit, and then turn the Orange up some.

Another way that we can adjust the color tones is by going into the Split Toning tab and use the Highlights or Shadows to apply tones, but we will save that for another day.

Let’s go back over to our All in One presets and this time we’ll go with Winter Night, which also adds a vignette. The vignette that was applied is a little too dark for this particular photo, but we can adjust that by going over to the Effects tab, then under Highlight Priority we will turn the Amount up to lighten the vignette.

Before we finish we are going to apply one more preset as a finishing touch, this time we will use the Tone – Creamy Highlight preset.

Now that we have finished with this photograph, we have applied a few more edits than with the previous photos. The end result is a scene with a much warmer tone and feel to it. Although we applied more changes to this one, it was still a quick and easy edit.

Thanks for following along and don’t forget to check out our YouTube channel for more great video tutorials.

How to work with A Winter’s Tale – Using Snow presets

Today we have a short tutorial to go along with our video about how to use the different snow presets which are included in “A Winter’s Tale” for Adobe Lightroom, to really enhance your winter photographs with nice snow effects. With this workflow, we can create some finished work that really captures the effects which most of us envision when we think about the winter season, unless of course you happen to live on a tropical island.

Let’s get right into it with our first photograph of a little girl in front of a snowy background. Before we add any snow, we are going to apply an All in One preset. For this photo we will go with All in One – Bright & Shine. After we apply this, we will tweak it a little by going over to the panel and turning down the highlights some.

Now, let’s scroll down through our “A Winter’s Tale” snow effect presets. You will notice that there are Horizontal and Vertical effects which are applied based on the orientation of your photograph. For this photo we are going to use Horizontal – Snowflakes #4. Although this snowfall effect isn’t meant to look real, it definitely adds something to the photograph, especially if you are looking for a nice effect for an image that will go on a Christmas or holiday card.

After applying the snow preset, the snow effect will some of the dodge spots right on the subject’s face, but that is something that we can fix pretty easily. To tweak this, we will click on the Radial Filter which show all of the spots where the “snow flakes” appear. With those visible, all we have to do is delete them from the all of the areas where we don’t want them. Once we have removed the spots that were obstructing our subject’s face, we can look at our finished image. We have added a nice magical effect of snow falling around the little girl in the photograph, a scene which comes to mind when we think about the winter season.

Now we are going to edit a second photograph that we have, this time of a boy standing in what looks like snowy field with a tree line in the background. We are going to start this one out the Lime & Mint All in One preset. Although this tutorial is all about the snow effect, we want to try some of the other presets in addition to the snow effects to show what you can really achieve with this workflow.

Speaking of snow effects, let’s get back to that and apply Horizontal – Blizzard #1 which is one of the Let it Snow presets. Once we apply this snow preset, we will go into the radial filter and delete the spots from the areas where we don’t want them to be. Make sure not to over do it with the deleting, we don’t want to have a ring around the subject where there is an obvious separation from the snow effect that has been applied. The idea is to make it look as naturally placed as possible.

In our end result we have added some nice snowy surroundings to the photo, giving that true winter feel like the previous photograph.

Let’s continue on to our third and final photograph that we are going to edit in this tutorial, this time of a woman standing in a clearing with snow on the ground and a few trees in the background. This one will be a very quick but effective edit. we are going get right into it and start by applying the Let it Snow – Horizontal – Snow #3 preset. Just like we did with the previous photos, we will have to use the radial filter to delete the snow spots that are in places where we don’t want them. We only needed to delete a few this time. That was a really quick edit.

We can see from the three photographs that we have just finished editing, just how quickly and easily we can enhance a winter image. We can add the effect of light or heavy falling snow, as well as a hazy or pure atmosphere. It is easy to overdo it with the snowfall effects, however with a little bit of practice to gain the right touch, you can create some really great winter or holiday scenes to share with friends loved ones or even customers, if photography is your trade.

How to Use the Hide and Seek Collection in Adobe Photoshop

We are back with another tutorial to accompany one of our videos, this time about how to work our “Hide and Seek Collection” for Adobe Photoshop. In this one, we are going to cover how to effectively use this collection of 78 Photoshop actions to give the best enhancements possible to your outdoor photographs.

Let’s get started with our first photograph that we will be editing using the Hide and Seek for this demonstration. The first photo is an outdoor portrait of a young girl sitting beside a path, on a rock.

With our “Hide and Seek” photoshop actions open, we are going to start by applying a Base Pretouch Brush, specifically the Brighten Eyes Brush. Once your selection has been made, you’ll need to click the “play” button, which will then apply the action to your photograph.

Before moving on, for the actions in this Hide and Seek collection, you’ll want to go ahead and set your paint brush up for them. To do that, click on your paint brush tool, then at the top, set the brush to normal and keep the opacity fairly low. However, we will be adjusting it as we go along, as needed.

Now, with the 20% brush selected, we will zoom into the picture, make the brush a bit smaller and apply the brush over the subject’s eyes to brighten them up a little. Once that brush has been applied, I will right click on Background in the bottom right and select Flatten Image, which will just flatten out the brushes and anything else that we have applied so far to this photograph.

We are now going to move on to an All in One – Tone/Tint action, for this one we are going to go with Wild West. Click play to apply. Once this action has been applied it looks a little too dark, but we can easily fix that by turning down the opacity, just a little bit. Then, Like before, we will flatten the image again by right clicking and selecting Flatten Image.

Next I am going to use a color correct brush, because when I applied the Wild West action, it added a little too much color to my subject’s clothing. So, going into the Color Cast Correct brushes, we’ll select Slight Desaturate. Once you click play, a box will appear that actually give some instructions, for example in this case, The box will say something like “with the black layer mask selected, use a soft white, low opacity brush to slightly desaturate and color casts on your image”, which is how we have already set our brush in the beginning. We are going to raise the opacity and make sure that we have a brush setting with a bit of a feather to it, we don’t want to use a brush with a sharp edge for this. With our black layer mask selected, we will run our brush over the girl’s clothing to desaturate the colors which are a bit overwhelming in this photo. If you look down at the layer mask, you can see everywhere that the brush has been applied. Before moving on, we’ll flatten the image, just as we did before.

Now we are going to move on to the Portrait Retouch Tools. It is great that these are included in this collection, even though this one is primarily designed for outdoor photography, as you can see in this video that what we are working on is in fact and outdoor portrait. So scrolling down through the portrait retouch tools, we will select Basic Retouch (eyes, skin, teeth). With that selected, we’ll lower the opacity a bit and start out with Soft Skin Smoother. For this one you may need to zoom in on the photo a little more to be a bit more precise. Gently run the brush over the subject’s face to smooth out the skin a bit. I should be a very subtle effect.

Next, we will use Bright Sparkly Eyes and use it over the eyes, raising the opacity first. This will add some more light and help bring out the eyes a bit. Go ahead and Flatten the image again and we will move right along to the next step.

The last thing that we are going to do with this particular photo is apply a layer of Levels to add a little more light.

In our end result we have add more light, brightened up the subject’s eyes a bit and really added more color as well, enhancing the overall photograph.

Let’s move along to our next photograph which is of a little girl in a white dress standing on a dirt path. Let’s start this one out by applying an All in One Tone/Tint, we’ll select Mint Herb and click play to apply the action. Once we’ve applied this action, you’ll see that it has added quite a bit of a green tint. To counteract that we will go over and lower the opacity to about 18%, which will reduce that green effect. Then, like before, flatten the image before moving on.

The next thing that we will to this photo is to use Basic Retouch in the Portrait Retouch Tools, like with the previous picture. Zooming in on the eyes, we are going to use Bright Sparkly Eyes to brighten up the subject’s eyes and make them stand out a bit more. We’ll also use the Soft Skin Smoother on her face. Now we’re going to turn use Rosy Blush, but turn the opacity down so the application just adds a very subtle effect to her cheeks. Now, we will flatten the image before moving on to next step.

We are going to use the Portrait Retouch Tools once again, but this time we will use the Paint Effect, lowering the opacity to about 16%, so our effect will be very subtle.

We will also apply a vignette, let’s go with Ink Vignette for this one. After applying this vignette the photo now appears underexposed, but that can be fixed. This collection has actions that can correct these kind of exposure issues. So, let’s go up to our Exposure actions and select Underexposure Correction. For this action we have to adjust the opacity ourselves, so let’s change it to 56% to add more light.

The one last that I want to do to this is to add an All in One Base. We will select Punch Base and click the play button. This action adds a nice yellow effect to the photo.

In our end result, we have a photograph in which we have added a lot of light, brightened the subject’s eyes and enhanced the overall photo with a much warmer look.

Now let’s get started on our final photograph for this tutorial. This one is of a little girl sitting on a set of red steps, surrounded by ivy.

We will start this one with Slight Desaturate in the Color Cast Correction Brushes. Making the brush bigger, we will use this brush over the bright red steps to tone them down, just a bit. This brush will basically strip some of the color. And, before moving on, we’ll flatten the image.

Now let’s scroll through to the All in One Base actions. This time we’ll use Vivid Base and turn down the opacity, then click the play button.

Then we’re going to add the Sour Cherry action under All in One Tone/Tint. Once you click the play button, you’ll see that this action has added a pretty noticeable effect to this photograph. We are going to adjust it a bit by lowering the opacity from 50% down to about 9%, giving us a more subtle effect.

The last thing that we are going to do to this photo is to apply a Levels layer. We’ll use this brush over the little girl in the photo, just to brighten her up some. Remember to flatten the image.

Now we can look at our finished image. We made subtle changes that have enhanced the colors and brought some more light into this photograph, really bringing a bit more life to the image.

Thanks for following along, I hope this Hide and Seek tutorial was helpful. Remember to visit us often for more updated tutorials and articles from our blog.

How to work with Forgotten Postcards: Sepia Tones

We’re back with another tutorial (accompanied by a great video), this time focusing on how to use our “Forgotten Postcards Workflow” to apply sepia tones to your photographs. Years ago when photographs were developed through a chemical process, the sepia effect was a way to add warm brown tones to photographs. With today’s technology we can apply the same effect through Lightroom, which we will get into now.

In the past, the sepia effect was reserved for making black and white photographs, however with digital photography, it is an effect that can now be used with color photos as well.

With our photograph pulled up, we will go ahead and get started. The first thing that we are going to do with this is to apply a “Forgotten Postcards” preset. You may notice that many of the presets included with this workflow have that rich brown tone to them. Starting with the Vintage Matte presets, we are going to apply Vintage – Matte Autumn. Once applied, you will notice that it has added our desired brown sepia tone to the picture.

Since we toned this photo, the effect has also added that brown tone to the highlights and whites. For that reason, we are going to make one more edit to this photograph by going into our “Forgotten Postcards” brushes and selecting the Light – Brighten brush. We are going to use this brush to brighten up our subject’s eyes a little, to correct for our previous edit that applied a darker tone to the entire photo.

That was it for our first photograph, just a quick two edits. Though these were fast and simple, the effects really changed the outcome of this image and even added a vignette, which was part of the Vintage – Matte Autumn preset that we applied. The end result is a warmer vintage feel while keeping some of the brightness in the eyes.

Now we will move on to our second photograph to edit. For this one we will start out by applying one of the “Forgotten Postcards” Nostalgic Effects presets. We will use Nostalgic Effects – Vintage 16, which will get us started with a sepia effect. I want to tweak this preset a bit, so we will go into the Basic Panel and raise the Exposure and Contrast just a bit, then turn the Shadows down some.

You may notice that sometimes when you apply a sepia tone to a photograph, it may basically convert the photo into a black & white, in a sense, with a brown tone. To work with that a bit, we will open up the B&W tab in the panel. This will give us access to the color sliders, which we can adjust to alter the color tone of the photo. For example, if I move the yellow slider up and down, it will change how much of that color appears in my picture. You will be able to see those adjustments change in the histogram as you make them. For our photograph, we are going to turn up the yellow to add some more light.

Note: If a color does not have much of a presence in the photograph, the adjustments with that specific color will be minimal, if at all.

Next, we are going to give this photo more of a vintage look by applying the Medium Black Vignette to it. Once applied, it seems a little too strong, so we can adjust that by going over to the panel and opening the Effects tab. Once there, under Highlight Priority, turn the Amount up just a bit to soften the vignette a little.

In our finished edit, we see a photograph that started as a nice color photo, and now has been transformed into black & white with a more vintage look and a light sepia tone.

And now on to our third photograph to be edited. We are going to start this one with a Nostalgic preset, similar to the previous photograph, however for this one we are going to use Nostalgic Effect – Vintage 10. This gives us our sepia effect. On top of that, we will apply another “Forgotten Postcards” preset, this time we will use Exposure – Brighten. Although this preset has added more light, which is what we wanted, it has also blown out some of the highlights in the photo. We can fix that by opening our Basic panel and turning the Highlights down some.

Now in our photograph, we have some split toning going on. To work with that, we are going to go over to the panel and open up the Split Toning tab so we can tweak the presets and get the colors that we are looking for. In the split toning tab we can adjust the highlights and the shadows. In the highlights we can see the Now we will move on to our second photograph to edit. For this one we will start out by applying one of the “Forgotten Postcards” Nostalgic Effects presets. We will use Nostalgic Effects – Vintage 16, which will get us started with a sepia effect. I want to tweak this preset a bit, so we will go into the Basic Panel and raise the Exposure and Contrast just a bit, then turn the Shadows down some.

You may notice that sometimes when you apply a sepia tone to a photograph, it may basically convert the photo into a black & white, in a sense, with a brown tone. To work with that a bit, we will open up the B&W tab in the panel. This will give us access to the color sliders, which we can adjust to alter the color tone of the photo. For example, if I move the yellow slider up and down, it will change how much of that color appears in my picture. You will be able to see those adjustments change in the histogram as you make them. For our photograph, we are going to turn up the yellow to add some more light.

Note: If a color does not have much of a presence in the photograph, the adjustments with that specific color will be minimal, if at all.

Next, we are going to give this photo more of a vintage look by applying the Medium Black Vignette to it. Once applied, it seems a little too strong, so we can adjust that by going over to the panel and opening the Effects tab. Once there, under Highlight Priority, turn the Amount up just a bit to soften the vignette a little.

In our finished edit, we see a photograph that started as a nice color photo, and now has been transformed into black & white with a more vintage look and a light sepia tone.

And now on to our third photograph to be edited. We are going to start this one with a Nostalgic presebrown color, so we will change that a little bit by turning down the Saturation in the highlights just a little, not too much. Then we’ll slightly turn up the Saturation under Shadows.

Similar to what we did with our last photo, we are going to be adjusting some color sliders in the B&W tab. For this picture, we’ll turn down the Purple and Magenta sliders. This will add a little darkness to the photograph.

Now that we are finished with this photo, we have given it that sepia effect, although with this one it is more of a yellowish tone. We also darkened the subject’s clothing, which was pink in the original color photograph.

I hope this was both entertaining as well as informative. Please join us again for the next one!

How to Work with Forgotten Postcards: Creating Light Leaks in Lightroom

Welcome back!

Today we have a short tutorial on creating light leaks, using our “Forgotten Postcards” workflow.

In the old days of film cameras, sometimes you would have an issue with light leak where for one reason or another light would get in and expose the film when it wasn’t supposed to, but that can sometimes make a really neat effect. Since modern digital cameras don’t really have light leaks, so we are going to show you how to add them to your digital photos, using the “Forgotten Postcards” workflow.

With my photograph pulled up, we will get started by going into our “Forgotten Postcards” presets and applying Color Correct – Reduce Greens, which will help us with that washed out, desaturated vintage look.

Scrolling down we will find 15 light leaks preset to choose from, which recreate effects that would be seen with an old camera that would have had a light leak.

For this photograph We are going to use Light Leak 13, which adds a nice golden hue. However, for me, there is a little too much yellow. We can fix that by going over to the panel and making adjustments like turning the Saturation down, or you could do it by applying another preset, which is the way we will do it now.

So, going back over to the presets, we’ll apply the Tone/Tint – Less Saturation preset. Once applied, it toned down the gold color a bit.

The next thing that we’ll do is add a vignette. We will go with Subtle Black.

The effects that we have made to this photograph are pretty subtle with more muted tones. It does have some vintage attributes, but very subtly.

Let’s go to our next photograph now. With this photo we are going to use a more traditional light leak effect, but first we will start by applying a Matte preset. For this we will use Vintage – Matte Watermelon.

Then, we will go to the Light Leak presets and select Light Leak 3, which gives us the light leak effect all around the edges.

Once applied, I’m going to adjust this a little and change the colors through the panel. The color that I want to tone down is the red one, so I will click on that and turn the Saturation down just a bit, then actually change the red to more of an orange tone.

Now we want to bring a little more light to the subject, so for that we will open up our “Forgotten Postcards” brushes and scroll down to the Light – Brighten brush. Turning up the Exposure a little, we will run this brush over the little girl, who is the subject in this photograph.

Looking at our after effect, we didn’t really change too much. We did give the photo an analog feel with that light leak effect. We have also added a really rich tone to it as well.

Let’s move along to our third photograph.

We will start this one with one of our “Forgotten Postcards” Nostalgic Effect presets, using Vintage 10, which will give the photo a muted sepia tone and wash the color out.

Next we will apply Light Leak 13, which adds a reddish tone. This isn’t exactly what we were going for, so we’ll click the filter button and adjust it by moving the effect back and rotating it a little. Also, we will change the color by moving it down to a lighter tone.

Now that we have that the way we want it, let’s go ahead and apply a vignette to give it more of an antique feel. Scrolling down through our “Forgotten Postcards” presets we are going to apply Vignette – Subtle Black.

That was a really quick edit, but we made quite a difference to this photograph. The effects that you’ll get from the Light Leaks aren’t necessarily realistic effects, but you will the aesthetic that you may be looking for in that old fashioned, vintage look. In certain situations, that may be exactly what you are looking for.

I hope you enjoyed this tutorial and found it helpful. Try our “Forgotten Postcards” workflow for yourself and see what you can create!

How to work with Forgotten Postcards: Vintage Effects in Lightroom

Hello, today we have a tutorial on applying vintage effects with our “Forgotten Postcards” workflow. This is a really great workflow since that vintage aesthetic is really popular right now, which “Forgotten Postcards” is great for, with all of the tools to add rich tints and hazy atmospheres to your photographs.

I have my photo pulled up, so let’s get right into it!

We will start with one of the “Forgotten Postcards” Vintage presets, Scroll down and we will go with Matte Autumn. Once applied, this preset doesn’t only darken the photo, but also adds a bit of a brown tone to it.

The next thing that we’ll do is polish this up a little by applying the Polish – Sharpen preset.

Then, we are going to stack a Base preset on top, let’s go with Base – What Dreams May Come to add a little more light.

Now that we have applied three preset to this photo, it has already made a big difference. Now it’s time to move over to our “Forgotten Postcards” brushes.

With the brushes open, scroll down and the first brush that we are going to use will be the Face – Sharpen Face brush. Although I want this photograph to have a hazy look, I don’t necessarily want that on the subject’s face. So, we will turn the Clarity up and apply this brush to her face to help keep her in focus.

Click New to start a fresh brush, then the next one that we are going to use is the Light – Brighten brush. Similar to what we did with the Sharpen brush, we will apply this brush to our subject, turning up the Exposure as we go. I will tweak this brush just a bit more by turning the Highlights down and the Contrast up a little.

A lot of times when applying this kind of vintage look to a photograph by using warm, rich tones, the eyes can often get washed out. So, the next thing that we’re going to do is basically color the eyes back in to make them a little less muted. Let’s go into our brushes and scroll down to the Color – Aqua brush. Before we apply this brush, let’s make the brush smaller and adjust the color a little, moving the blue down to a less bright tone. Then, just run the brush around the iris of each eye.

Once I have colored her eyes, I will turn the Saturation, Exposure and Contrast up a bit, adding more light and contrast.

We took a nice photograph and wanted to give it an old school, vintage look, so we have added a hazy atmosphere and a rich, warm tone to it. But, we kept the detail of the subject and the color in her eyes.

Let’s move along to our next photograph.

In this next photo, I am going to start with one of the “Forgotten Postcards” Base presets. Scrolling down through those, we will go with Base – Auto Tone to add more light to the photograph.

Another common effect that you will see with vintage photos is a matte effect, so for this one we will scroll down to the Matte presets and apply Vintage – Matte Watermelon, which has added a warmer tone to the photo.

Now we will move over to our “Forgotten Postcards” brushes. Let’s open them up and select the Light – Brighten brush. I am going to turn up the Exposure and Contrast, then apply this brush over the girl in the picture, since she is the subject, we want to add more light and pull her out a little.

We will click New and start a fresh brush.

Now we are going to go back into our brushes and select the Color – Mustard brush. This brush has a really nice yellow color, adding a nice tone to your photograph. Turning the Exposure down, we will run this brush all around the edges, adding a richer tone to the scene.

As we look at the before and after of this photograph, you’ll see that we started with a nicely exposed photograph. Then, we added a matte effect and a hazy atmosphere surrounding the subject. We also added a warmer, richer tone with that mustard colored brush. Finally, we added a bunch of light to the subject to bring the focus in on her.

Now, on to our third photograph. This clean and modern looking photo is kind of a less conventional photograph to give a vintage look to, but we are going to do it anyway, since I think it will work out nicely.

To get started we are going to apply the All in One – Yesteryear preset, which will add a matte effect with muted colors. The one thing that happens when applying this preset is the Clarity get raised way up, but we can tweak that by just going into the Basic tab and turning it back down some.

Now we are going to go down to the Nostalgic effects, for this we will go with the Nostalgic Effect – Vintage 1preset, which will brighten the photograph while adding a rich, warm tone.

I am going to tweak this a little by turning the Highlights down, as some of the highlights were kind of blown out and really bright around the windows and curtains in the background.

Even though we are going for the effect of muted colors, I do want to bring some of the blue back into the photograph because the blue details in the clothing will work really nicely.

So for that, we will go into the Color tab and under Saturation, we will turn the Blue and Aqua up a bit. Once turned up, it brings a lot of that color back to the clothing.

The last thing that we will do is add a vignette to this photograph which is traditionally seen in old or vintage photography. Going back to our “Forgotten Postcards” presets, let’s scroll down and select Vignette – Subtle Black which will add a subtly darker toned border around the outer edges.

Hope this guide helps you out and don’t forget to check our videoguides on how to edit photographs with “Forgotten Postcards Workflow” – you can ace vintage effects in only a couple of minutes!

How to Work with Forever Thine: Vintage Aesthetics in Lightroom

Welcome back! Today we’ll be taking a look at how to work with the “Forever Thine” wedding themed workflow, more specifically, how to apply a vintage looking aesthetic to your photographs.

This is becoming more popular, especially with weddings that are outdoors, in the spring or fall. The effects give the photographs a nice homegrown, vintage wedding look.

Let’s go ahead and get started with my first photograph, which is of a bride and groom walking from their outdoor wedding ceremony.

To start this one off, we will use a “Forever Thine” Base preset. Let’s scroll through those and select Base – Camellia, which will lighten the photo up just a bit.

Next, we’ll move on to a Tone & Tint preset and to help create that vintage, faded matte effect, we will apply the Fading Dream preset.

Another nice aesthetic that is really popular is a matte effect. With several different matte effects included in the “Forever Thine” presets, there many choices. In this photo we are going to go with the Matte – Wanderlust preset. Once applied it has added some contrast, but also added some matte finish to the darker areas.

To adjust this preset a little we will go into the Tone Curve, by dragging the bottom of the lineup some we will add to the matte effect.

Other presets that add a nice vintage look are the Film presets, so let’s scroll down to those and go with Film – Sunset Boulevard, which will change the color and tone a bit.

Next, we’ll move over the “Forever Thine” brushes, starting off with the Light – Darken Shadows brush. Making the brush larger and lowering the exposure, we’ll apply this brush to the background to help darken the shadows some, making sure to get in close to the subjects so they aren’t outlined by a ring of light. The point of using this brush is really to bring the focus to the subjects of this photograph.

In the before and after, starting out with a nice wedding photograph, we added an old school or vintage effect which goes along nicely with the fall theme already in the photograph.

So now we’ll move on to another photograph, this time of a bride and groom on a shoreline with the bride’s veil blowing in front of them. Like the previous photograph, we will give a vintage effect to this one as well.

Getting started, we are going to go back to our “Forever Thine” Film presets and like the previous photo, we’ll apply Sunset Boulevard.

Next, we will scroll down to the Wedding Vintage presets and apply First Class.

The really nice thing about these presets is that they are completely stackable, so while applying one on top of another, you aren’t canceling out the effects of the one previously applied.

Now just to tweak this preset a little, we’ll go over and open the Basic tab, then move the Clarity up just a bit.

Those are the only two presets that I’m going to apply, now we’ll move over to our “Forever Thine” brushes.

Starting out, we will use the Light – Brighten Highlights brush. Let’s turn the Exposure up and apply this brush all around the bride’s veil as well as the groom’s suit.

Now let’s go back into the “Forever Thine” brushes, then scroll down to the Wedding – Clarity & Detail brush and apply this brush to the veil and dress, to help bring some more of the detail out.

Next, I am going to open up the Basic tab and move the Exposure and Contrast up slightly.

Now when we applied one of the presets, we lost a lot of the blue in the sky. To fix that and bring it back we’ll open up the controls for the colors, then slide the Blue up some. I’ll push the Red down a tiny bit as well.

Finishing up with this photograph, we can see that we have given it an older looking sepia effect with a nice brown tone. The picture that we started with was a nice photograph, we just gave it more of a vintage look, which is really trending right now.

Now, on to our third photograph. In this photo the bride and groom are standing in front of a white fence, a little further back from the camera. This is a nice photograph, however above the subjects it looks like some of the highlights coming through the trees are a bit blown out, so we will have to fix that as we go.

Getting started, we are going to go into our presets and apply Wedding Vintage – Pine, which darkens the photo and gives it a warmer tone. Once applied, let’s open the Basic tab and slide the Highlights down quite a bit, so we can get some of that detail back in the background. It has really darkened the photograph, but we will bring some like back to the subjects as we go along.

This photograph is framed naturally by the trees in it, but we are going to enhance that by adding a vignette. In this photo we will use Vignette – Black Heavy. Since this is really dark, we will go over the Effects tab and Slide the Highlight Priority Amount up a little so it isn’t as dark around the edges.

Let’s now move over to the “Forever Thine” brushes and select Wedding – Fix Underexpose which will help bring some light back. So, we’ll make the brush a little bigger and run this all around the subjects and the center of the photo, turning up the Exposure, Contrast and Clarity while we go.

Now going back into the brushes, let’s use the Wedding – Clarity & Detail brush. Turning the Exposure up, we will run this brush right around the bride and groom to bring a bit more detail and light back to them.

That’s all that we will do with this photograph. By adding this vintage effect, we have focused a lot of light on the subjects while giving it a nice warm tone and color.

I hope that you enjoyed this tutorial and found it helpful. Hopefully you’ll be able to try our “Forever Thine Workflow” for yourself soon.

How to Work with Color Fantasy: Warm vs Cool Colors in Lightroom

Today we are going to be working with Sleeklens’ “Color Fantasy Workflow”, more specifically, we will be talking about how to identify and enhance warm and cool color tones in your photographs. For those that may not know, the warm colors are the reds, oranges and yellows, while the cooler colors are blue, greens and purples. So, let’s get right into it.

The first photograph that I am going to work with having a city street in the background, not giving the photo very much warmth. This cooler toned picture has a lot of blue and gray really with the only warmth coming from the subject’s skin and a little bit of the brick in the background.

To get started, we will go into the “Color Fantasy” presets. In order to bring out those cool tones and enhance its overall, the first preset that we’re going to use is the All in One – Light, Contrast and Color. Once applied, This preset has brought out more of the blue, but it has also brought out the warmer tones in the subject’s skin.

Next, we’ll scroll down the Base – Dreamy preset and apply that, which will add a soft feel to the photograph.

Then to enhance the blue in the photo, we will apply the Color – Blue Burst preset.

Now that we have applied those presets, we will go over and open the Color tab to manually manipulate the colors. To achieve a cooler looking picture, I want to take some of the warm tones out of it. Going to the orange, red and yellow, I will adjust the sliders. Starting with the red, we’ll turn that down quite a bit to help cool off the red brick and building fronts in the background. Next we’ll adjust the orange slider down just a little, if we turn it down too much we will lose the color and pigment in the subject’s skin, which will look weird. Like the orange, we will only adjust the yellow slider just a little bit.

Going back into our “Color Fantasy” presets, we will now apply a vignette to this photograph. For this one we’ll go with the Strong Black vignette, to add some contrast and help focus the light to the center on the subject.

Although the photograph that we started with already had those cooler tones, we went in and really enhanced them. In the before and after shown in the accompanied video, you’ll be able to see the obvious differences that were made to the photo. Refocusing the tone and light, we have enhanced the complimentary effects of the subject’s skin tone with the cooler colors in the photograph.

Moving on to our next photograph, which opposite of the previous photo, has a warmer feel to it. With the yellowish tan in the tall grass and also the pink and magenta tones in the clothing, so we will go ahead and enhance those warm tones.

Starting out with an All in One preset, let’s scroll down and select Retro Vibe, which is going to bring some light and a matte effect to the photograph.

Still in the “Color Fantasy” presets, we will scroll down to the Base presets and click on Splash.

Next, we want to bring out the nice magenta colors in the photo, so to help with that we will apply the Color – Magenta Burst preset, which will make these colors stand out much more.

Now in this photograph, I think a vignette would be really nice and help bring the subjects forward more. So, the vignette that we are going to apply to this photo in the Vignette – Brown Black. With this vignette the brown toward the inside in coming from the masks that have been applied to the photo, and the black is coming from the effects and our Highlight Priority. Once applied, it seems a little too dark for this photo, so what we will do is get rid of the Highlight Priority and turn that way up, but leave the Masks on there. This will leave us with the brown effect, while getting rid of most of the black.

If necessary, we can move the mask to better suit the photo with the cursors. We are going to move the masks in this picture by rotating and moving forward and back to best suit this photograph.

Now, we are going to move over to the “Color Fantasy” brushes. Once we click New, let’s scroll down to the Color – Warmer brush. We’ll turn up Saturation and use this brush down in the lighter areas in the grass, giving the photo a subtly warmer effect.

Go ahead and start a fresh brush by clicking New, and the last brush that we’ll use for this photo will be the Color – Desaturate brush. We will use this brush around the top of the photo, to take some of the blue out.

What we end up with is a much warmer photograph, bringing more light and color to the center and really enhancing it overall.

Let’s go on to our third photograph, which has a mixture of warm and cool colors, with a warmer red on the steps and the cooler green of the ivy along the sides. In this case you could go either way with it, but for this photo I’m going to go with a warmer tone.

To start out, we will go into our “Color Fantasy” presets and select Base – Auto tone to bring more light back into the photo.

Then, we’ll go down and click on the Exposure – Darken Shadows preset to add a little contrast.

And on top of those two, we’ll add the Polish – Sharpen preset.

Now I want to focus on the little girl in the photo, so we’ll go into our “Color Fantasy” brushes, this time we will go with the Light – Brighten brush.

We’ll turn the Contrast and Saturation up and the Shadows and Exposure down, then run this brush over the subject, adding a little more light and helping her to stand out more.

So, that was a pretty quick edit and all I am going to do to this photograph. The color in this photograph is really nice the way it is and doesn’t need much enhancement. All we have done was apply three presets and a brush, really changing the photo quite a bit.

Starting out, this photograph was really dark and a bit underexposed, the colors weren’t as bright and the photo was really dull and washed out. The edits that we made have brought a lot of light and color back into this photograph.

I hope this tutorial was helpful as well as enjoyable. Hopefully you will be able to try out our “Color Fantasy Workflow” for yourself soon.

How to Work with Color Fantasy: Using Color for Seasons in Lightroom

Hello, today we are going to be working with the “Color Fantasy Workflow” by Sleeklens. We’ll be talking about how to use this workflow to really enhance the photographs that you may take during different seasons.

So getting right into it, I have my first photograph open, which looks like it was most likely taken sometime during the spring. There are two girls in the photo wearing colorful spring dresses and the grass is nice and green. And let’s see how Color Fantasy could help improve the photo.

We will start out by applying an All in One preset and for this one, we will go with Colorful Dreams. For the spring we tend to use a lot of pastels and bright colors, so for this photograph I’m really going for a bright and saturated effect.

Next we will apply another preset, this time we will scroll down and select Exposure – Darken Shadows, to help add a bit more contrast.

Then scrolling down to the Color presets, we are going to apply the Color – Green Burst preset. Like its name suggests, this preset changed what was yellow toned grass to a more of a green color, which is a nice fresh color for spring.

Let’s now go down to the Tone presets and apply the Cool Shadows preset, just to add a slightly cooler tone to the picture and get rid of a little bit more of the yellow.

The last thing that I am going to do with this photograph adds a vignette. Let’s scroll down through the presets and select Vignette – Subtle Black. Even though I added this vignette, I feel that for this photo, it needs to be tweaked a little. So for that, we’ll go over to the Effects tab and change some settings under Highlight Priority. Currently set at -13, we’ll move the Amount Slider up a bit to -6.

Now we are going to open up our “Color Fantasy” brushes and select Light – Brighten. With this brush, we will turn the Exposure up just a little, then apply it over the two girls in our photo, just to add a little bit more light to them.

Closing out the brushes, we’ll move down to the Basic tab and turn the Highlights down some, because when the preset was applied the Highlights were turned all the way up, slightly blowing out the suns reflection directly on the subjects.

Now going back into the “Color Fantasy” brushes, we’re going to use the Light – Add Golden Sun brush. Then, before applying this brush, I’m going to change the color of it from a very golden yellow to a lighter tone of yellow. Once that’s done, we can go ahead and apply the brush to the parts of the photo that are directly lit by the suns rays, such as the visible beams coming through the trees in the background and onto the subjects.

So that’s all we are going to do with this photograph. Starting with a photograph that was really washed out and lacking in color, we’ve added a lot of great color and light back into the photo. Bringing out those nice colorful spring tones, we have really enhanced this photograph.

Moving on to our next photograph. This photo of three girls sitting in a beached row boat looks like it may have been taken in the summer. One thing that I want to touch on is that even though the “Color Fantasy” workflow is about color and light, they don’t always have to be bright, vibrant colors. It really is left up to what colors and light work best with the scene and the environment in a particular photograph.

With this photograph, even though it was taken during the summer, it looks like the picture was taken around dusk and has a much more muted appearance, so we’re going to go with that theme for this one.

So, the first thing that we’ll do is apply an All in One preset. When we scroll through the “Color Fantasy” All in One presets, we are going to go to the Good Old Days preset, which will add a lot of life to the photo and really brightens it up.

Since that all in one preset took away most of the blue that was in the photo, I am now going to apply the Color – Blue Burst preset to give us some of that blue tone back.

One of the defining features of this photograph is the pretty light blue dresses that the girls are wearing, so to bring those out a little more, we’ll go into our “Color Fantasy” brushes and select the one named Haze – Cyan. To make this brush a little less hazy, I’ll turn the clarity up just a bit, then we can apply the brush to the dresses to bring out some more of that blue color. Remember, you can adjust the size of your brush to suit the area that you are working with. We’ll also turn up the Saturation, Exposure and Contrast add more light, while applying this brush.

Then click New, and apply the Haze – Cyan brush once again, just to add a bit more light.

The nice thing about the Haze brush is that it really adds to the tulle dresses, since the tulle fabric already has a hazy look to it.

Before moving on, I am going to use that Haze – Cyan one more time, but in the sky and on the horizon, just to bring some of the other blue tones back into the photograph.

So moving on, we’ll go ahead and click New to start a fresh brush. For our next brush, we will use the “Color Fantasy” Color – Green Tint brush and add some green back into the tall grass behind the boat.

One of the nice things about this workflow is that it comes with some really great color brushes, which basically work like a real brush, allowing you to paint as you would on a canvas.

Click New to start a fresh brush and this time we are going to use the Light – Brighten Shadows brush. We’ll run this brush a little over the side of the boat and also on the ground, brightening shadows and pulling a bit more detail out.

For the last edit to this photo, we’ll go into the Details tab and turn the Amount up under Sharpening.

In the after effect of this photo, we have added a lot more light to the photo while keeping the nice blue colors that were there. We’ve also added a warm vintage feel to it, which gives that relaxed summer vibe to the photograph.

Next up, we have a photograph that looks like it was most likely taken during the fall. In the fall we typically see really awesome rich reds and oranges and other nice autumn colors.

We are going to be starting this one by applying an All in One preset, which will be Retro Vibe 2. Once applied it kind of washed out the color, but it did give the photo a nice matte look.

So, to get some of that color back we will add the Color – Magenta Burst preset, which will bring a lot of the tones out that are in the subject’s dresses and the ground which is covered by leaves.

For this photograph, I do want to apply a vignette, so we’ll go with Medium Black. With that applied, I do want to turn down the vignette just a little bit, so we’ll go into the Effects and move up the Amount under Highlight Priority just a bit.

Like we did before with the other photographs, We are going to start using the brush to add color and light back into the photo.

For the first “Color Fantasy” brush we are going to use Light – Brighten. Once selected, we’re going to turn the Exposure up a tiny bit and apply this brush to the girls in the picture, giving them just a bit more light. Since they are the subjects of the photograph, we want them to stand out a little more.

Then, we’ll click New, and go back into the “Color Fantasy” brushes. Now, we are going to use some of the Color brushes to add some of the color back to the photo. The first one that we are going to use will be the Color – Magenta brush. For this brush I left the Feather at 100, but I did turn the Flow down because I don’t want to have so much color that it looks unrealistic. We’ll apply this brush in spots in the leaves on the ground and in the trees, to get some of that red tone back.

Next we will use another Color brush, this time Color – Mustard and apply it just as we did with the magenta brush.

Now, one last “Color Fantasy” brush. We’ll scroll down and select the Haze – Golden brush, which we are going to use up in the trees.

So, that’s it for this photograph. Although we didn’t make huge changes to this photo, the effects are subtle with added light and a nice matte finish. We also brought us some of the warmth with those fall colors.

I hope this tutorial was helpful and you get to try the “Color Fantasy Workflow” out for yourself soon.

How to Work with Forever Thine: Creating Classic B&W Images in Lightroom

Welcome back! Today we have another tutorial on the “Forever Thine Workflow”, this time we’ll be talking about how to create classic B&W images. You may sometimes find that, although an image is nice, it may look even better in black & white. With this workflow, you’ll be able to make these edits quickly, keeping up with your particular time frame.

With the photograph pulled up, that I will be working with using Forever Thine, let’s go ahead and get right into it.

We will start out by opening up our “Forever Thine” presets and scrolling down to the Wedding Black & White presets. There you will find many choices for black & white such as different tones, contrasts, sepia and many more. For my photograph I’m going to use Wedding Black & White – Old School, which a basic black & white effect.

Then, I want stack Polish preset on top, so we will go with Polish – Sharpen.

After that, I am going to add a vignette. For this photo I am going to use the Black Dreamy vignette.

Then we’ll scroll back up to the Polish presets, but this time we will use High Contrast.

So, this was a really quick edit. All we did was stack four presets on top of each other, but in the before and after you can see that we’ve really changed the picture quite a bit. We have not only changed it to black & white, but we’ve added some contrast and a nice vignette. And, all of it was done super fast.

Now let’s move on to another photograph, which is of a bride standing in a doorway. This photograph is somewhat underexposed in certain areas, so let’s fix that and bit and bring some of those details back to this photo.

Starting out with a “Forever Thine” Wedding Black & White preset, we will scroll down and choose Ivory.

Next, we will apply the Polish – Sharpen preset, similar to the previous photo.

Now, we will scroll up to the “Forever Thine” Base presets and use Base – Fade In, which will brighten up a lot of the shadows and brought out a little more of the detail in the background.

Moving over to our brushes, let’s open up the “Forever Thine” brushes and scroll down to the Wedding – Fix Underexpose brush. We’ll turn up the Exposure and Shadows, then apply this brush right around the brides face, bringing out some of her features.

Like the previous photograph, another quick, but really effective edit. With this photo we have changed it to a nice black & white, while adding contrast. We have also brightened the shadows a bit, bringing more of the detail back, that was previously hiding in the shadows. Just a really easy, but classy effect!

Next we’ll move on to our third photograph, which is a really nice photo, but unfortunately really dark and underexposed.

To start out, before changing the exposure, I am going to apply the black & white preset that I want to use.

Scrolling down through the Wedding Black & White presets, I am going to use the Stardust preset.

Now we will go over and open up the Basic tab to tweak that preset some. First I’ll turn up the exposure a little, then go down to Shadows and move them up as well.

Then, we will go back over to our “Forever Thine” presets and apply Polish – Sharpen.

For the last bit, We will go into the “Forever Thine” brushes and use the Wedding – Fix Underexpose brush, like we did in the previous photos. We’ll apply this brush to our subjects, just to add a little bit more light to them.

With this final photograph, in addition to transforming it to black & white, we also fixed the underexposure and brought out more light and detail, creating a better image all around

I hope you enjoyed this :Thine” tutorial and found it helpful. Hopefully, you’re able to try it out for yourself soon.

How to Work with the Forever Thine Workflow in Adobe Lightroom

Hello, today we are going to get into wedding photography, and how to make editing this complex subject easier, using the “Forever Thine Workflow” by Sleeklens.

The best part about this Forever Thine workflow is that it is specifically aimed towards wedding photography, which is extremely helpful for a photographer who has taken hundreds of shots, and then needs to make a ton of quality edits in a short amount of time. Our “Forever Thine Workflow” comes with 112 wedding specific presets which will give you plenty of options to edit with. This workflow also includes 23 brushes, allowing you to make any local or precise adjustments to your photograph.

I have my photo pulled up, so let’s go ahead and get right into it. The first thing that I am going to do is go into the “Forever Thine” presets. We’ll scroll down to the Base presets and click on Base – Warmer. Then we will scroll down some more until we get to the Tone/Tint presets, this time going to Fading Dream. Remember, even though presets are one click edits, you can still go over to the navigation to tweak and adjust as needed.

For my photo I am going into the Basic tab, then changing the Tint to +45 and the Clarity to +40.

Next, we will use a brush to make a small adjustment to the photo. Going into our “Forever Thine” brushes, we will use the Fix Underexpose brush. We’ll apply this brush right in the center, directly on the subjects to bring a bit more light to them.

As you can see, that edit took less than a minute to perform, improving the overall quality of the photograph and added a nice, warm dreamy feel to it.

Moving on to the next photograph. For this one, we will be using the “Forever Thine” Black & White presets. So,let’s scroll down and select the Black & White – Ivory preset.

Once applied, we will tweak this preset a bit by going over to the panel and moving the Whites up to +31.

Next, we’ll go back to the “Forever Thine” brushes to make a few small adjustments. Going into the Wedding brushes, we’ll go with Shiny & Bright. We will use this brush generally on the subjects, doing this three times, clicking New each time. This is just bringing up the shadows a little bit and adds a bit more light.

Now we’ll go back and choose another one of our “Forever Thine” brushes, this time we are going to use the Wedding – Clarity & Detail brush. As its title suggests, this brush is used in areas where you want to enhance the clarity and details. For the photo that I am using, We’ll run this brush mostly over the bride’s veil and dress, which will help bring out the detail of the lace a bit more.

Now that we are done with this one, the before and after shows that after only about a minute or so of work, we have taken a color photo and quickly created a nice black & white photograph with beautiful enhancements.

And now on to our third and final photograph. In this photo, we will start out by using one of the “Forever Thine” Wedding – Film presets, we’ll go with Breakfast at Tiffany’s. This preset adds some contrast and gives this photo a really nice brownish, sepia like tone.

Next, I will go over to the panel and use the Spot Removal Tool to clear up the street in the picture a little.

Now that we have done that, let’s go into our “Forever Thine” brushes. Once again, we are going to use the Wedding – Shiny & Bright brush. We will run that brush over the bride and her veil, then click New to start a fresh brush, this time going with Wedding – Fix Underexpose.

We will use the Fix Underexpose brush on the bride and her bridesmaids in the back, slightly turning up the Exposure as we go, just to add some more light to all of them.

So, now I am going to use one of the custom brushes that comes with Lightroom. We’ll go with the Tint brush, but make some minor adjustments before we apply it. I’m going to set the Tint to 36 and the Temperature at 29. We will use this brush on a couple of the bridesmaids who have a little paler skin, just to make them blend in a bit more.

We can tweak this photo a bit more by going to the Detail tab, then to Sharpening and raise the amount just a bit more.

In the end effect, we have really brought the bride out more and muted the colors some with a nice slight sepia tone. We have also enhanced the contrast and light, giving the photograph a more polished and professional look overall.

As you can see the “Forever Thine Workflow” not only helps make editing wedding photos much easier, but drastically cuts down on processing time as well, while allowing you to create breathtaking photographs, preserving those memories for a lifetime.

I hope this Forever Thine workflow tutorial was helpful. Make sure you check out our other tutorials and hopefully you can try these workflows for yourself soon.

How to work with Grayscale Essentials: Creating Vintage Photographs

Hello all! Today we have another tutorial on how to work with the “Grayscale Essentials” workflow by Sleeklens. Specifically, We’ll be talking about creating vintage photographs using the Matte, Sepia and Film Grain presets that are included with this workflow.

So, let’s get right into it. For my first photograph, I have a picture up of a boy sitting in front of what appears to be a wood paneled building.

Getting started, the first thing that I’m going to do is go into the “Grayscale Essentials” Tone/Tint presets. We are going to use the Tone/Tint – Sepia preset.

Once that has been applied, we will go over to our Basic panel and make some adjustments to that preset, turning the Contrast and Exposure up just a little bit.

Now let’s go back over to the presets, this time we’ll go with the Effects – Film Grain 3 preset, to give the photo an even more vintage feel. This preset will give the photograph kind of a grainy texture.

The last thing that we’ll do to this photograph is use a vignette. Going back into our “Grayscale Essentials” presets, we will scroll down and select Film Grain Vignette 5. When applied, we will get a white vignette, however I want it to be black. We can change this by going over to the panel on the right and going into Effects, then Highlight Priority. From there we will move the Amount Slider back until the vignette is as dark as we want it to be.

What you may find with older photographs is that if they aren’t in black & white or not completely tone sepia, you’ll often find the colors more muted. For that, we can go into the Colors tab and make adjustments. In this photo we are going to turn down the saturation of the colors, to get more muted tones. Next in the Colors tab, we’ll go to Luminance and turn up the Yellow and Aqua.

So, that’s one way to do it. What we have done mutes the colors a bit and given its an old, used photograph feel.

Now let’s move on to our next photograph. We’ll start with this photo by converting it to black & white. To do this, we will scroll down through our “Grayscale Essentials” presets, until we get into Film – Black & White Contrast 3. Once we’ve applied that preset we will scroll back up through our presets and select Exposure – Matte Finish, giving the photograph that vintage matte finish that we often see with older pictures.

Next we will go ahead and tone it with the Tone/Tint – Sepia 3 preset.

Then, like the previous photo, we are going to use a vignette again, but instead of using the vignette preset, this time we are going to go into Effects and make our own.

So, go over to the panel on the right, then go into the Effects and move the Amount slider to lighten it up a bit.

Go back over to the “Grayscale Essentials” presets and find the Base preset. This time we’ll go with Base – Classic, just to add a little bit of a darker tone. After applied, I am going to open up the Basic tab and make adjustments by bringing the Contrast, Highlights and Shadows down just a bit.

Now we want to add that grain back in. To do that, we will go to our Effects presets and select Film Grain 4, really adding a grainy vintage feel to the picture.

That is all we are going to do with this one. We started with a highly saturated, modern photograph and gave it a really nice vintage feel.

Now we will move to our third photograph. For this one, I am going to start with an All in One preset.

Let’s go into our “Grayscale Essentials” presets and click on the All in One – Yogi Bear preset. I like this preset because it does convert the photo to a grayscale, but it also adds a sepia tone to it, which give this photo a nice dark brown tone.

Next we will go to the Base – Clean preset, to bring a little bit of light back into the picture. Then to get that grainy effect, we will use the Effects – Film Grain 3 preset.

Before we finish I want to also add a vignette, so for that I am going to use Film Grain Vignette 3, but like earlier, I would prefer it not to be white. So to fix that, like with the previous photo, we will go into our Effects, the Highlight Priority and move the Amount slider down to give the vignette a much darker tone.

Next, we will go into our “Grayscale Essentials” brushes, then scroll down and select Light – Brighten. I’m going to run this brush all over the subjects, increasing the Exposure some, just to add a little more light and help them stand out a bit.

In the after effect of this photo, you’ll see that we have added the matte effect, the grain and the sepia, all coming together nicely to give this photograph that old fashioned, vintage look.

I hope you all enjoyed this short tutorial and found it helpful. Hopefully you can try it for yourself and create some beautiful images soon !

How to Work with Grayscale Essentials: Using Light and Dark to Enhance your B&W Photos

Welcome back! Today we are going to be working with the “Grayscale Essentials” workflow by Sleeklens. In this tutorial, We will go over how to use light and dark to enhance your black & white photographs.

Starting out, I have a color photograph up of two girls walking between rows of trees, which I have already gone ahead and converted to black & white, using the All in One – Syrup preset.

Sometimes you may want to change your photographs to black & white, so you’ll add a black & white filter or switched it to black & white and the photo feels kind of flat or everything blends together, with the subjects no longer standing out in the picture. For that reason, we are going to talk about using certain tools in our “Grayscale Essentials” workflow.

So, let’s now scroll down through our presets and apply the Vignette – Black preset. Once applied, it has added a whole lot of dark contrast to the outer edge of my photo.

So, now we will go over to the brushes and open the “Grayscale Essentials” brushes. We’ll scroll down and select the Light – Brighten brush, then use this brush over the subjects to really bring some light back to them and make them stand out.

Then I will click New, use the same brush, but make it smaller and increase the exposure, then go over the subjects once again.

Going back into our “Grayscale Essentials” brushes, let’s scroll down and select the Light – Darken Shadows brush. Sometimes you will notice that when you go with Darken Shadows, it will come with a pale yellow color to it. Since we are working in black & white, I don’t want to have any color tone to it, so we will move the color all the way down until it is gone.

We will go ahead and use this Darken Shadows brush all throughout the trees and foliage in the photo, while turning the Shadows down a little. We’ll also use it on the ground some.

Next we will click New, but go back and select the same brush, making it smaller. With this brush, I am going to turn the Exposure down a little and run it around the subjects to get rid of the ring light directly surrounding them.

The last that we will do with this photograph is go back to our “Grayscale Essentials” presets and apply Polish – Sharp as a Tack, to sharpen the photo up a little bit, then we’ll use Exposure – Darken Shadows. Then to slightly adjust the darkened shadows, I will go over to the panel and turn the Shadows up and the Highlights down just a bit.

So, what we have done is added a lot of light to the subjects in the middle, while really darkening the outer edge of the photograph. This has made the subjects really stand out and added more depth and dimension overall to the photo.

Moving on to our next photograph, in this one we have a color photo of a little girl lying with a newborn.

This time we are going to change the photograph to black & white without using an All in One preset to do it.

To start, let’s go over to the Colors tab and click B&W, which will automatically change it.

Now that we have converted the photo to Black & white, we can go over to our “Grayscale Essentials” presets and add a vignette. For this photograph, I’m going to go with the Vignette – White preset to make the image a little softer.

Once applied, it seems to be a little too much white, so we’ll go over to the Effects tab and under Highlight Priority we are going to slide the amount down, just a little.

For the next “Grayscale Essentials” preset, we will apply Polish – Fuzz, which will give the photograph a softer look, to compliment the newborn and small child in the picture.

What we can do next, is going back into our Colors tab and use the sliders to change the colors in the photograph. For example, whatever red was in the photograph before being converted to black & white I can now manipulate. So, what I will do is pull the red and orange up a bit, then pull the yellow down a little. If there wasn’t much of a particular color in the photo before converting to black & white, there won’t be much to manipulate with that color after.

Next, we’ll open our “Grayscale Essentials” brushes again and scroll down to the Face – Sharpen Face brush to help eliminate some of the out of focus look on the face, caused when we applied the Polish – Fuzz preset.

We’ll go ahead and run this brush over the subject’s face, increasing Sharpness and Clarity as we go along. Although we want that nice hazy look around the subjects, we don’t really want that on their faces.

Similar to what we did with our previous photograph, we’ll go back into our “Grayscale Essentials” brushes and go for the Light – Brighten. We will turn the Exposure up a little bit and use this brush to add some more light to our subjects.

After that, let’s click New, and go back to our brushes. Now we’re going to select the Light – Brighten Eyes brush and zoom into the photo pretty close. I will use this brush on the subject’s eyes, to add some more light to them.

Now, we will use one more “Grayscale Essentials” brush on the photograph. We’ll go into our bushes one more time and click on Light – Darken. I will use this brush to go over some of the areas where I want to darken some of the shadows, such as the hair and maybe some of the background as well.

So, before we finish, I want to use one last custom brush. This time we’re going to use the Contrast brush and go over the lace on the little girl’s dress to bring that out some more.

Alright, now we’re done with that photograph. We have taken a color photo and created a soft black & white photograph with a slightly more muted feel, while maintaining some of the light and dark texture to it.

I hope you all enjoyed this tutorial and found it helpful. Hopefully you can go try it out for yourself soon!

How to Work with Grayscale Essentials: Working with Tone and Tint

Today we have a short tutorial about how to work with the “Grayscale Essentials” workflow from Sleeklens, specifically, adding tone and tint to your black & white photographs.

Now that I have my photo up that I will be working with, the first thing that we will do is is apply an All in One preset.

First, I’ll apply the All in One – Matted preset, then scroll down through the many other “Grayscale Essentials” presets and apply Tone/Tint – Violet.

Now let’s move over to the Split Toning, this is where I will be able to make the changes that I want. As I look down in the Shadows, it shows that I have a kind of blue tone. Here I can go in and change that, moving it up to a more of a dark purple tone by just dragging the little dropper around to where I want it, then I’ll turn the Saturation all the way up.

For the Highlights we have a light reddish pink color, so we will change that to an actual pink, but way down to the bottom for a pale tone. As we play with the Saturation, you’ll see that it gets really, really pink or back down to a very subtle color. I will also lower the Balance Slider, located in the middle, making the photograph turn more purple. To fix that, we will just decrease the Saturation a bit under Shadows, and slightly increase the Saturation under Highlights.

So, now we have gone through and changed the tone of this photograph. We started with color photographs and changed it to black & white, then we applied a violet tone to it. Remember that, you can use the settings to change your photo any way that you like. Sometimes it’s nice to have a slight color tone to your black & white photographs, they don’t always just have to be grey, black and white.

Now, we will move on the our next photograph of a little girl sitting on a rock, with what appears to be some farmland in the background.

For this one, we will start out by applying the All in One – White Castle preset to convert the photo to black & white.

Then we’ll scroll down and apply POLISH – Sharp as a Tack, then we will also apply the FILM – B&W Contrast 4.

With those presets applied, I have added a lot of contrast and kind of blown out the highlights just a little bit. To fix that, we will go over to our Basic tab and turn down the Highlights some.

Next we’ll go back over to our “Grayscale Essentials” presets, this time scrolling down through the many Tone and Tint presets. For this photo we are going to go with the Green/Red preset, which isn’t really my favorite, but as mentioned before, we can go into the Split Toning and change it to how we like it.

Green and red are opposite each other, but can sometimes be complimentary colors, however we will go ahead and change the Shadows to more of a blue color and lower the Saturation quite a bit.

For the Highlights, I will change the color to a brighter green and decrease the Saturation quite a bit here as well.

So, let’s now move on to our “Grayscale Essentials” brushes and select the Light – Darken brush. We’ll turn the Exposure down and apply this brush to the girl’s white shirt, because it is extremely white and kind of distracting from the rest of the photograph. While applying this brush, I will also turn the Contrast up a little, then the Shadows, Highlights and Whites down.

When it comes to the tone and tint, you can really use whatever color that you like, it’s up to you. For my photo I went with a greenish blue color and added a little detail. This just changes the picture a little and gives a bit more of an artistic feel to it.

So that’s it for this one. I hope this was helpful and that you can go try it for yourself soon.

How to work with Chasing Light: Facial Contouring

Hello all, today we have a really short tutorial about how to work with the “Chasing Light“ workflow from Sleeklens. More specifically, we will be working on facial contouring, using the light and dark brushes. So, let’s get started.

Now that I have my image up and ready, the first thing that we’re going to do is add highlights to her face to contour the areas that we want to really stand out. For this purpose, we are going to start out by going into our “Chasing Light” brushes, choosing the LIGHT – Brighten brush.

When it comes to Portraits and faces there are specific areas that you may want to highlight or darken to contour the face a little more. You also want to the direction from which the light is coming. In the photo that I am working with, the light appears to be coming from the subjects left side. Even though that is the case it is still straight forward on her face, so we will go ahead and highlight areas such as the forehead, in a sort of inverted triangle, turning the Exposure and Highlights up a bit. We’ll do the same right under the eyes, on the chin, bridge of the nose and also the “cupids bow” between the nose and upper lip.

Some of the others areas that I like to highlight, just to make them stand out are the center of the bottom lip and some of the muscles in the neck.

Even when the user chooses the brushes that come with the “Chasing Light” Workflow you still have the ability to go over to the panel and play with the sliders in order to get the photo the way you like it.

Now that we’ve applied the brush, we can move the little hand cursor over and highlight the affected area, you will be able to see exactly where your brush was applied. If necessary, you can still make adjustments with the sliders, In my case I’ll slightly turn up the Exposure, since I am highlighting here.

Next we will go back into our “Chasing Light” brushes and select the LIGHT – Darken brush. I will use this brush to contour all of the areas where there would normally be shadows. You could use the Darken brush to contour any areas that may want to look smaller.

The typical areas that you would use this brush would be up along the hairline, on the temple, under the cheek bone, along the jaw line and also along the sides of the bridge of the nose. Remember that you can make adjustments to the brush size and the sliders in the panel as you go along. The Darken brush is also useful for filling in eyebrows and also darkening the make up just a little, which will really help the eyes pop out.

So, there it is! We have gone over how to contour using the light and dark brushes from our “Chasing Light” workflow. If you look at the before and after in the video, you’ll see that we have basically added a little more light to the photograph.

I hope you enjoyed this tutorial and found it helpful. Hopefully you can try it out for yourself soon.

How to work with Chasing Light: Fixing Underexposed Images

Hello all, today we’re going to talk about how to fix underexposed images, using our “Chasing Light” workflow. When you have an image that is underexposed, you’ll find that it is a bit darker and the colors are muted. But, not to worry, we have the tools to fix it right here.

So, now that I have my photograph of three little girls sitting in a small boat pulled up, let’s go ahead and get started.

One way you can fix and an underexposed image is to go into the “Chasing Light” presets and scroll down to EXPOSURE – Brighten 2, that will bring my photo up two stops.

It is important to note that fixing an underexposed image isn’t just about bringing light back into the photo, but is also about fixing the colors that have been lost.

So to help with that, we are going to use a second “Chasing Light” preset. This time we’ll use Lomo Baby 2, which is an All in One preset. Once applied, this preset has given the photo a warmer tone and has also brought out the turquoise and aqua colors in my photograph.

Next, I will apply a Polish preset from the “Chasing Light” workflow, this time Sharpen 2 to help sharpen the image a little bit.

Now that we have added our presets, we’ll move into our “Chasing Light” brushes. I will show you how we can use the brushes to further enhance the photograph.

The first brush that we will go with is the LIGHT – Brighten brush. I’ll turn the Exposure up quite a bit, then use this brush all along the subjects in the photo, just to bring some more light to them.

Let’s click New to start a fresh brush, then go into our “Chasing Light” Color brushes. This time we’ll go with COLOR – Cooler.

When we select this brush, we can see that it has kind of a white tone. I am going to move the color up to more of a turquoise/blue tone, and use it to add a tiny bit of color to their dresses, to help make the dresses stand out more. We can play with that color some, by making adjustments to the sliders in the panel, in my case I’ll turn up the Saturation, Contrast and Exposure.

Now, even though we have applied the presets and stacked them on top of each other as “one click edits”, I will now go into my Basic tab and play with the temperature. I want to warm the photo up a little bit, just to compliment the blues that are in the photograph.

Before I finish with this photo, I want to add a vignette. Let’s go back to our presets and scroll down to VIGNETTE Medium Black 2.

With that applied, it looks a little darker than what I want, so what we can do to lessen that effect is going to the Basic tab, then down to Effects. Open Effects, look for Highlight Priority and there we will adjust the amount up a little.

That’s all we are going to do with this photograph. In the before and after, you’ll see that we have taken an underexposed image and really added a lot of light and color to it. This is really the perfect way to use our “Chasing Light” workflow, as it is about bringing color and light back into your photographs.

Moving on to our next photograph, this one is an underexposed photo of a little girl sitting on a beach near sunset.

Like the previous photo, we will begin by applying some “Chasing Light” presets, we’ll start with EXPOSURE – Brighten. Once we have applied that preset, you’ll occasionally see that some of the highlights may become blown out, especially with the sun in the photo. To correct the highlights we will go over to our Basic tab, then tweak the preset a bit by turning down the Highlights some, which will bring back that blown out detail.

Next we will use an All in One preset, this time we’ll use Paisley 2. Now we’ve added color, but lost some of the light. To fix that, we will go back over to our Basic tab and turn the Exposure up a bit, then turn the Highlights down again.

When we applied this preset, it also added a bit too much warmth. There are two ways to fix that, first by adjusting the Temperature slider, or I could go into the Color tab and choose the colors individually that I want to adjust. For this photo, we will pull the Yellow up and the orange down a bit, giving the photo more balanced colors.

To help balance it out a little more, we’ll pull the Blue up some for the sky and then, we will pull up the Magenta slightly for the pants that the subject is wearing, making the color pop a bit.

Now we’re going to move over to the “Chasing Light” brushes for this photograph.

The first brush that we’ll choose is going to be the Add Golden Sun brush. We will use this brush to add some light back where the sunset is affecting the photo, However, the color that it has chosen is a little too bright for this photograph, so we will open the colors and fix it. We will just move the yellow down to a more pale tone, more fitting for this particular image.

Once we have it right, we’ll just apply that brush to the area around the sunset and down into the sand a little bit. We can also drag it into the water as well, keeping a natural effect.

Alright, so let’s go ahead and click New to start a fresh brush, then go back into our “Chasing Light” brushes. This time we’ll choose the HAZE- Golden brush and go over the same areas as we did with the Golden Sun brush, really just adding to the sunsets effect.

Like we did in the last photograph, we will add light to the subject. Let’s go back into the brushes and select the LIGHT – Brighten brush. Apply this brush right onto the subject, turning the Exposure up some, just to add more light to her. After we have applied the brush, we will go into our Effects, then under Highlight Priority we will raise the Amount slider a bit. For this Photo, we did not choose a vignette, but when we applied the All in One preset, it was automatically added. With making this adjustment we can have slightly less of a vignette. And now we’re done with this photograph.

As you will see in our before and after, we started with an underexposed image and we have not only raised the exposure, but we’ve added a lot of overall color and light to the subject. We have also added a lot of contrast between the golden color around the sun and the blue in the sky.

I hope you enjoyed the tutorial and get to try out our “Chasing Light” workflow for yourself soon.

How to work with Chasing Light: Using Light and Color on Portraits

Hello, welcome back! Today we are going to be working with the “Chasing Light” workflow from Sleeklens, this time we’re learning about how to use light and color on portraits, in order to make our subject stand out.

Now that I have the photo up that I want to work on, let’s start out by working with some of the “Chasing Light” presets. We’ll go with POLISH – Sharpen 2 for the first one.

The next preset that we will apply is a BASE preset, we’ll go with Fresh Color 2.

Now that we have applied a couple of presets, now we will go over to our “Chasing Light” brushes and use those to really enhance the detail in my Photo.

So, let’s open up the “Chasing Light brushes and scroll down to the LIGHT – Brighten brush. We will run this brush all around the subjects face and hair, just to add more light in general. Now I will click New, using the same brush once more, but this time I will turn the Exposure up a little bit. I will also make my brush a little smaller, you can also do this using the bracket keys([]) for the keyboard shortcut.

We will use the brush to kind of contour and add some more light to the face, going over the typical areas such as the forehead, cheeks, chin and bridge of the nose.

For this photo, I’m going to repeat the process with this brush again, but now I will make the brush even smaller and turning up the exposure some. I will use it to go over my subject’s eyes.

Now we will click New to start a fresh brush and go back into our “Chasing Light” brushes, now choosing Soften Skin. I am going to use that brush all around the face. Since we did apply the Sharpen preset at the beginning, it kind of sharpened the detail on the face a little too much, so we will just use this Soften Skin brush to soften it out some.

Moving on, let’s click New, and choose another “Chasing Light” brush, this time we’ll use the LIGHT – Darken brush. I will use this brush all around in the background. While applying this brush, I am going to turn the Exposure down just a little bit. By darkening the background and adding light to the subject, we are making the subject really stand out from the background in the photo.

The last brush that we are going to use for this photograph is the LIGHT – Brighten Highlights brush. We will apply this brush to the hair to add a tiny bit of definition, especially to the darker parts.

That’s all we’re going to do to my first photograph. In the before and after view, You will see that we have sharpened the photograph, added a lot of light to her eyes and face. We have also really made the subject stand out from the background more.

So, moving on to my next photograph. For this one we will also start out by applying some of the “Chasing Light” presets. The first one that I will apply is going to be the POLISH – Sharpen preset.

For the second preset we will go up to the COLOR CORRECT presets and click on Reduce Greens. However, I don’t want to reduce the greens too much, so I will go over the colors tab and move the Green Slider up just a little bit.

Next we will move on to our brushes. Let’s go into our “Chasing Light” brushes and scroll down to LIGHT – Add Golden Sun. We’ll click on this brush and run it around the brighter area, to add a more golden haze to the photo. You would add this to where the sun appears to be affecting the photo more.

Now, we will click New and get started on a new brush. We will go with the LIGHT – Brighten brush again, in this photo I will turn up the Exposure some and run this brush over the girl sitting on the scene, just to add some more light to her.

Next we will start a New brush and go back into the “Chasing Light” brushes, this time going down to the LIGHT – Darken Shadows brush. I am going to run this brush all around the areas behind and under the subject to add a little more depth and dimension.

Now let’s go back over to the presets and apply the TONE/TINT Warm It Up preset. Since we added that golden sun effect, I want to make it a warmer portrait.

Once that preset has been applied, we will go back into our brushes. We’ll go with the LIGHT – Darken brush and apply to the areas behind and under the subject, adjusting the Exposure as we go. We will also use this brush in the hair, just to darken some of the highlights a bit.

Let’s now go back over to the presets, this time we are going to use the Medium Black Vignette. Although, it is a little too much of a vignette, so what we can do is open our effects and look for something that say “Highlight Priority”, then move the Amount Slider up just a little.

That is all we will do with this photograph. If you watch the accompanying video, you will see that in the before and after, we have added a bunch of light directly on the subject and darkened the area surrounding her. We have also added a golden, sunny haze and really warmed up the photograph in general.

For our final Photograph, we have a photo of a girl holding an umbrella over her left shoulder.

To start out we are going to apply an Exposure preset, since the photograph seems to be a little underexposed. So, let’s go with the Brighten 2 preset, then we will go over, open up the Basic tab and turn the Exposure down just a bit, as the effect was just a little too bright for this photo.

Now we will go into our brushes and scroll down to the LIGHT – Brighten brush, just as we did in the previous photograph. We’ll go ahead and apply that all over the subject, we’ll also apply this brush to the umbrella that she is holding as well. You can click New and repeat the process as much as you need, adjusting things like Exposure as you go along, to get the look that you want.

Next, click New to start a fresh brush, then we will go back into our “Chasing Light” brushes, and this time we are going to choose the COLOR – High Saturation brush. We will use this brush to go over the dress that she is wearing, to bring out all of the colors. So for this, I will turn the Saturation up a lot, then the Exposure and Contrast up a little.

Similar to what we did with our last photo, we’ll go ahead and add a Vignette to this one as well, also going with the Medium Black.

Then, we will go back into our “Chasing Light” brushes and select the Darken Shadows brush. I will use this all throughout the background.

Before we finish, I am going to adjust the vignette slightly. Let’s go down and open up Effects and Highlight Priority, then pull up the amount just a little bit.

So, the before and after of this photo will show that we have added a lot of light to the girl and brought out a lot of color in her dress. We have also darkened the background a bit to the photograph a little more depth and make her stand out.

I hope you all enjoyed this tutorial and found it helpful. Now go out there, try it for yourself and discover what you really do with your photographs, with the help of Sleeklens.

How to work with Strike a Pose: Editing Hair

Welcome back, today we have a tutorial on how to define and enhance hair in your portraits with our “Strike a Pose Workflow“. Now I have my photo pulled up, let’s get started.

The first I am going to do is go to my brushes, click New to start a new brush, then scroll down to the Strike a Pose brushes. The first brush that we’re going to use will be Define Blonde Hair in the Strike a Pose HAIR brushes, since our subject has blonde hair

Once that brush is opened, you’ll see that the settings will be adjusted for you. Also, if you open the colors, it will be in the blonde color range. This will help add color and definition to the hair.

Now, we will run this brush all around her hair. Keep in mind, that as you apply this brush to the hair, you can adjust the brush size to suit your needs.

Once you have run the brush through her hair, we can go over to the panel and use the sliders to change the setting a little bit. For this brush the Contrast was set all the way down, but for my photo, I’m going to turn it up some. I will also pull the Exposure up a little, because I want to lighten her hair as well.

I will also move the Clarity up, but just a bit.

Now that we have applied changes with the Define Blonde Hair brush, you’ll notice that we just basically add color and light to her hair, but It has really changed the overall look.

So now, I will move on to another brush and delete the one that we just used. Go ahead and click New, to start a fresh brush.

Now we will go back into the “Strike a Pose” HAIR brushes, this time we’ll go with the Add Shine brush. You could use this if the subject in your portrait had dull or flat hair. You’ll see that with this brush, the highlights and clarity are turned up a bit, pulling out the shine and the light reflecting off the hair, really enhancing the look.

After you have applied this brush to the areas that you want to affect, You can move the hand cursor over to highlight and see where you’ve run the brush.

The before and after shows a lot more light has been added, and those shiny highlights have really been brought out.

Now, we will move on to another brush. Go ahead and delete the changes just made, then start a fresh brush by clicking New.

For the next brush, we’re going to go back into our “Strike a Pose” brushes and select the Define Hair brush. The effects of this brush will really up the clarity and adds just a little bit of color, giving more overall definition to the hair. Even though it is a yellowish color, you could use it on a subject with darker hair. This is a brush that you may want to use if the hair on your subject is slightly out of focus or simply need a bit more definition and texture to add to the photograph.

The changes that I’m applying to my photo are very subtle, but if you wanted to add more definition you could push the Clarity Slider up some.

As I said, it is a subtle change, but it really does make a difference in the photograph.

We have gone over the Define Blonde Hair, Add Shine and the general Define Hair brushes, so now I’ll change to a different photograph, this one time where the subject has dark hair.

Let’s go back to our brushes and this time, we’ll choose the “Strike a Pose” Define Dark Hair brush. Unlike the Define Blonde Hair selection, there is no color attached to this brush, but instead the contrast has been turned down, which will help bring out the darker tones.

If while applying this brush, you decide that you want the hair to be even darker, you can go over to the right panel and turn the Exposure and the Highlights down.

Now that we have applied that brush, we can see that we have really darkened the hair, especially closer to her head.

You may notice that it has taken some of the definition and contrast, making it a little bit of a flat black color. To fix that we can go into our “Strike a Pose” brushes and use the Add Shine brush. We’ll run this brush through the flat areas to bring back some of the contrast and highlights that I lost before, making adjustments in the panel to Exposure, etc. Along the way.

In the after effect you can see that the subject’s hair has been darkened and a little more defined than before.

After deleting those previous effects, let’s go to another brush. This time we are going to use the Add Punch, again in “Strike a Pose”. Add Punch helps to add shine, contrast and clarity all at once, giving your subject’s hair an overall boost. It won’t make a huge difference, but it is going to add something to your portrait. When photographing people, hair can be a defining trait that you’ll find your photos.

Go ahead and run this brush throughout the hair.

You’ll see that the changes made are very subtle, but what it has done is brought contrast and clarity and added a lot of definition.

There is one last thing that I want to show you, using the “Strike a Pose” workflow. For this we’ll go back to the first Portrait that we were working with and go into the “Strike a Pose’ COLOR brushes.

With these I want to show you how to slightly change the color of the hair, so in the “Strike a Pose” COLOR brushes, we’ll choose the Warmer brush.

The girl in my photo has blonde hair, but I would like to change it to a more brown color, with the Warmer brush we can do that.

Once we select this brush, we will then go into the colors and move it up into the darker orange range, then start applying the brush to her hair.

I am going to go over to the panel and turn down the Exposure, to give that darker orange more of a brown tone. When running the brush through the areas of the hair that you want to affect, you can also play with the colors to find the effect that works best for you.

For my photo I’ll move it back to the more reddish orange range, then turn the Exposure and Shadows down. To get less of an orange color, I will also turn down the Saturation to make it more of a natural color.

Now that we have changed the hair color from blonde to more of a brunette color, I will then go into the “Strike a Pose” LIGHT brushes.

I will show you how we can use the LIGHT – Brighten and LIGHT- Darken to add highlights and lowlights.

We will make the brush really small and start with LIGHT – Brighten, to add highlights. Since my subject already has some natural highlights, we will just go ahead and apply the brush along with those. We can even move up the Exposure Slider to make them a little lighter.

Now we will use the LIGHT – Darken brush, to add lowlights to her hair. With this brush we can use it to go over the natural lowlights in the hair. It also helps when we want to darken the hairline as well. Darkening the hair around the face is especially helpful when you want to make the face really pop out in the photograph.

So, there you have it. The before and after of this photo shows that we have started with blonde hair and given our subject a slightly darker brunette color that still looks natural. We have also added more highlights and lowlights. And that’s how you can use the Hair brushes in the “Strike a Pose workflow” to add color, contrast, shine and overall definition to hair in your photographs.

I hope you’ve all found this tutorial helpful and can try it out for yourself soon. Don’t miss our other guides on Strike a Pose Workflow for enhancing eyesfixing skin tones, or achieving perfect facial details